Yeomanry vs. Aristocracy

by W.F. Price on January 24, 2014

Writing for the Washington Free Beacon, Matthew Continetti paints a picture of an American political aristocracy possessed of a childish lack of self-awareness:

…I am referring to the cringe-inducing moments of false modesty. Wagner complains, “Every trip to the high-end knife shop in D.C.’s Union Market ‘costs us about $500.’” Weisberg reports, “Friends describe Kass as reserved,” despite the celebrity chef’s multiple television credits. Weisberg writes, “Their ideal Saturday night is dinner with friends—not a red-carpet event,” and then, in the very next sentence, notes, “In October, they attended the News and Documentary Emmys, at which Wagner was nominated, but sneaked in a side door to avoid the cameras.” Wagner describes her horror when she broke a heel on the way to a job interview with George Clooney (she got the job). Mention is made of Kass’s five post-college odyssey years, “cooking and eating his way around the world,” including “planting corn with Zapatista farmers in Mexico.” Weisberg describes Michelle Obama circa 2005-2006 as “an overtaxed working mom.”

But it would be a mistake to stop at the first read, for the reader to limit himself to his immediate reaction. Whatever emotions the article provokes, wherever one stands on the political spectrum, upon closer examination Weisberg’s text becomes a discomfiting ethnography of contemporary meritocracy, an acid test of how power is transacted in America today. Our politicians and celebrities, Democrat and Republican, paint an ideal picture of life where one’s success depends on hard work and initiative bolstered by community; where all Americans begin the race of life on an equal footing, and those who start off disadvantaged should be helped by some agency—whether in government or the private sector—until the contest is a fair one. The assumption is that, with the right institutional mix, one’s natural talents will carry one to the appropriate social station. It is not who you are but what you do that is supposed to count.

It is not every day that an article in Vogue magazine exposes the shaky foundations of democracy. But as I read “The Talk of the Town” for the second time I could not help noticing how these attractive, talented, up-and-coming thirty-somethings relied, again and again, on personal connections to get where they are today. Weisberg describes the couple’s success in terms of “personal intensity and random luck.” But the luck here is less random than he thinks. Kass and Wagner were lucky to be born to their parents, and if they have children their sons and daughters will be lucky to be born to them. They are members of a self-perpetuating milieu, a caste of right thinking yuppies whose position and wealth and patterns of consumption are the fruit of personal relationships spanning decades. There is income inequality, for sure, but there is also status inequality, and this latter form of inequality is a topic on which most bourgeois bohemians are silent…

It’s hard to believe that these people are unaware of their own privilege, but you’d be surprised by how well the elite has managed to isolate its children – now young adults – from reality. I grew up with some of these people, and they really were unaware of the larger world around them — as children and youths, at least. It seemed that instead of teaching them about the world, their parents did all they could to wall them off from it. Sure, the brighter ones knew something was off, but they were very good at ignoring their position at the top, and reacted with naked hostility when it was mentioned. The people they hate and fear the most – and trust me on this one, I know it first-hand – are the white working and middle class. But it isn’t really racial hatred. A lot of people mistake it for that because they see a lot of Jews among these new aristocrats, but these are Jews by ancestry only, and they are essentially indistinguishable from their gentile colleagues. In fact, they typically intermarry. No, the real reason for the hatred is fear. We are the workers, soldiers, farmers, tradesmen and businessmen whose loyalty is questionable, and who could turn on them at any time and ruin their beautiful, charmed lives.

It was back to D.C. Wagner met with Democratic mastermind John Podesta—“an old Washington neighbor” whose relationship with her father was longstanding. Podesta gave her a job at his new think tank, the Center for American Progress. Which led to a job in New York City at Fader magazine. Which led to the job with George Clooney. Which led to a gig covering the Obama White House for the now defunct Politics Daily. Which led to MSNBC. Her agent is Ari Emanuel, brother to Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel and to Dr. Zeke Emanuel, a frequent guest on her show. “Wagner talks about the series of events that brought her from that Los Angeles pay phone to MSNBC’s soundstage as if it were the most natural progression in the world,” Elle magazine noted a couple years back. Of course she does. It was natural for her.

What the Chinese call guanxi, networks of influence, benefited Kass and Wagner. It brought them together. The incestuous nature of the relationship between the media and the Obama White House is well established. Here is another example. Kass’s friend, Richard Wolffe, is known as Obama’s most loyal scribe—a title for which there is plenty of competition. He was the ideal fixer-upper of Kass and Wagner. And it was another node in Kass’s network, Edward Cohen, a member of the Lerner family that owns the Washington Nationals, who arranged to have the park opened for that very special game of catch. I’m sure Cohen will do the same for you if you give him a call.

It’s undeniable that personal connections – often due to family – count for a great deal in urban America today. Whenever you read about a young so-and-so opening a hot new restaurant in a trendy city, or some eclectic little business start-up, you can bet with reasonable confidence that his or her parents are well-connected. This is far more the case today than it was a mere generation ago.

“The game is rigged,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) famously told the 2012 Democratic National Convention. What an odd situation in which we find ourselves, where the most influential figures in politics, media, culture, and the academy, the leaders of institutions from the presidency to the Senate to multinational corporations to globally recognized universities, spend most of their time discussing inequalities of income and opportunity, identifying, blaming, and attacking the mysterious and nefarious figures behind whatever the social problem of the day might be. This is the way the clique that runs America justifies the inequalities endemic to “meritocracy,” the way it masks the flaws of a power structure that generates Brown-educated cable hosts and personal chefs who open ballparks with a phone call. This is how a new American aristocracy comes into being, one as entitled and clueless as its predecessors, but without the awareness of itself as a class.

Indeed. But there is also a great deal of lack of awareness on the other side as well. Middle and working class Americans – what I like to call the American yeomanry – are not fully apprised of their own status, and imagine it to be higher than it truly is. They think the door is open to them through hard work and talent, and have little idea of the hostility the new aristocracy holds for them. They think there is common ground, but this is no longer so.

It’s time for us to admit that we have no place in their world, and set about removing them from ours.

{ 44 comments… read them below or add one }

geographybeefinalisthimself January 24, 2014 at 13:34

“‘The game is rigged,’ Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) famously told the 2012 Democratic National Convention.”

Don’t expect a Democratic politician, including Warren herself, to have any substantive desire to create any game where anyone has a fair chance of success. I could probably give multiple reasons why, but anyone reading this comment would say tl;dr. Here are just a few:

1.) Democrats would have to abolish ALL affirmative action (they haven’t even taken into account that the workforce has been majority female since 2009 and that females in their 20′s outearn males in their 20′s; both of these REALITIES don’t fit their narrative);

2.) Democrats would have to abolish ALL of the counterproductive rules that every disabled individual encounters when trying to get off of disability (Democrats clearly don’t want the disabled to flee from the Democratic plantation any more than they want able-bodied blacks or able-bodied Hispanics or other minorities to do the same; these rules were put in place by Democrats, NOT by Republicans, the latter of whom actually want disabled people to contribute to society as much as possible);

3.) Democrats would have to abolish the perception that some people can get away with certain activities both on and off the clock while others cannot get away with even a fraction of those exact same activities on and off the clock; the Supreme Court ruling in Snyder v. Phelps, which upheld the right to picket at funerals (I don’t condone this behavior, but keep reading) was really only a victory for free speech for the members of the Westboro Baptist Church, as I would be extremely surprised if anyone else could get away with picketing even one funeral and still have a job on the next work day. (Brent Roper, husband of Shirley Phelps-Roper, was fired from a job due to one of these protests. He filed a lawsuit for wrongful termination, and received a massive settlement. Steve Drain was also let go from a job due to one of the church’s pickets, but the termination went unchallenged; I would imagine that had he filed a lawsuit he would have received a settlement.) I will believe that anyone outside their congregation can get away with their behavior and still have a job when I see it.

4) Democrats would have to do something about the fact that in thirty-five states, government assistance can amount to a larger total value than holding down a minimum-wage job. In fifteen, it has more value than a $15.00 an hour job. Since Democrats are also fighting people every step of the way in their attempts to no longer rely on the government, why should anyone believe that Senator Warren wants the game to no longer be rigged?

5) Here’s one area of the game being rigged (in a life or death area) where Senator Warren will really shut her trap when asked if she is serious about making the game fairer. A man who is a combat fatality can’t earn any money at all. An aborted fetus also can’t earn any money at all. (Someone should ask Senator Warren if she would have favored her mother having abortion rights when she was pregnant with Warren if she was seriously considering terminating her daughter.) We have already established that feminist lawmakers who have never served a day in the armed forces in their lives have no problem with accusing male servicemembers of sexual assault without naming their names, without knowing their names, without even saying it to the servicemembers’ faces, and while getting defensive when being accused of being unpatriotic. There is ALWAYS going to be armed conflict. The United Nations couldn’t stop sibling rivalry in a two-child family if its life depended on it, and it has failed to stop conflict completely since 1945. So how does Senator Warren plan to remedy the fact that conflict will always occur and that it will end many men’s ability to earn money?

I could probably think of even more areas where Senator Warren is not even remotely sincere in those remarks, but I’ll let commenters below put them in their comments to wrap this up.

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Brian January 24, 2014 at 14:23

Price, which (types of) people do you categorize as members of the “elite” or “aristocracy”?

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Anon66 January 24, 2014 at 14:27

When people talk about economic mobility in the US they usually think of upward mobility, but historically there has been a lot of downward mobility as well in the US. Fortunes are made and lost.

Unsurprisingly people who become wealthy and powerful then want to change the rules and block others from competing with them which might cause them to lose ground. This was more difficult when the government, which is the vehicle to rig the system, was smaller. Now that government effects every aspect of our lives it is much easier for the cronies to get together and dictate the outcome. Our current group of elites in the political and business classes see an opportunity to become permanently enshrined at the top. You can see this in career politicians and political families. You can see it in “To Big to Fail”. You can see it in the 10,000 page tax code. And on and on and on.

They are aware of what they are doing and the malcontent that is growing. This is of course the reason for the mass immigration we have seen over the last few decades. They want us gone.

The question is how to stop them.

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W.F. Price January 24, 2014 at 14:31

@Brian

Basically those who are second generation or more upper class, and who stay in the circles they were raised in (do not marry out of their social milieu or associate with others, for example).

Brian January 24, 2014 at 14:40

@gbfh

That’s correct, and Elizabeth Warren is just one of numerous leftist ideologues among politicians who directly or indirectly want a more or less totalitarian state (with themselves ruling of course). Others include Nancy Pelosi, Barbara Boxer, Dianne Feinstein, the list goes on.

To be fair, leftist politicians don’t deserve complete blame for the harm they do. As politicians, they need to respect their constituents adequately to get and stay in office. Hence, the people that elected these crazies also deserve some responsibility for our ridiculous public policies and procedures.

Universal suffrage where everyone has equal voting power is a horrendous idea.

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greyghost January 24, 2014 at 16:05

This is human nature, The “serfs and nobles” from early elementary school.
One way in is to attend an IVY League school.

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Anonymous Reader January 24, 2014 at 16:37

In a way it is more similar to the ancient Chinese mandarins. But the effect is certainly aristocratic, especially given the increasing failure to deliver real world results.

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Days of Broken Arrows January 24, 2014 at 17:00

Great observation. Articles in glossy magazines often lack self-awareness, but this one takes the (let them eat) cake.

I assume that if the couple in question sees this, they’ll hire a PR person to better stage manage their image. Seriously.

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Kingsley Davis January 24, 2014 at 19:50

A certain faux conservative (RINO) governor from New Jersey recently discovered that his foolish attempt at reconciliation was chum that caused a feeding frenzy amongst the ruling leftist elites.

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FTLOTBP January 25, 2014 at 00:16

Our “leaders” (read: rulers) are more out of touch with the commoners than ever before. And once that becomes too extreme, revolution, civil war, or the like is soon to come. I’m going to be away from it, abroad, but I hope the proles have fun hanging every last oligarch and pig and aristocrat from every lamppost in America.

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Pirran January 25, 2014 at 03:11

@greyghost
“This is human nature, The “serfs and nobles” from early elementary school.
One way in is to attend an IVY League school.”

This is just the first step. Then you need to attach yourself to a scion of the great and good who can speed you on your way. You will be a slavish foot-soldier to their every need without being obviously obsequious (very infra dig and redolent of parvenus and proles; who wants to be reminded of that as a third generation Democrat fixer and shaker?).

Only then can you hope to become a “trusted friend” or confidante. This will require more sacrifice (of both time and money) throughout the ensuing years before you marry (hopefully) into the inner circle, carefully maintaining the appearance of trite concern for the less fortunate whilst smoothing the path for the fortunate.

It’s your own children that will benefit most, of course. They will be born into the inner circle as of right, but you knew that going in.

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Dire Badger January 25, 2014 at 04:54

@ftlotbp-
they will, but historically such a rise of the middle class is immediately followed by low-class ‘empowerment’.

Unfortunately, the losers at the absolute bottom of the dung heap are usually there for a very good reason. Placing them at the top universally results in horrendous mismanagement, starvation and death, a series of ridiculous ‘rules’ with almost arbitrary penalties and violations, and decades of horrible treatment for the middle class that started the uprising in the first place… at the end of which, if they are VERY lucky, the same ruling elite are back in charge again. (If they are not lucky a new class of ruling elite, one better at lying about how bad the lot of the average citizen is, is placed in charge for the fifty or so years it takes for them to self-immolate)

The ideal government is one of three things, all of which are inherently unstable and nearly impossible to maintain for any length of time:

A) Yeoman government. worked in the US for nearly 30 years after the revolution before the federalists finally managed to convince everyone that they could be the ruling elite. Yeoman government HAS to be controlled strictly through paring down and refreshing the rulers from among the yeomen… good methods of doing so are requiring land ownership to vote, requiring military service (with tightly controlled prerequisites) , or some sort of meritocracy… this government works wonders for egalitarianism, and is almost perfect for that sort of fantasy, which is why it is utterly abhorrent to egalitarians… without an oppressed majority, egalitarianism cannot exist.

Enlightened nobility- wonderful if it works, rulers that actually understand their people. Too bad this always turns to shit as the original nobility dies and is replaced by their retarded and ignorant offspring who proceed to ditch all responsibility and strip their people of everything for their own masturbatory purposes. Whether they are called ‘the party’, ‘the politburo’, or ‘the military leadership’, the end result is always the same…the country getting sold off for geegaws to a more vibrant economy unless they are lucky enough to have ANOTHER civil war.

small (city-state) style governments- This only works so long as no one particular government becomes too powerful. the majority live in comfort, freedom, and security, but unfortunately this comes at the price of a minority who live in utter and abject misery. Such a style of government is inherently stable, because of it’s small size the leaders never truly lose touch with the needs of the ruled…. except for the poor bastards outside the walls, who are totally fucked, especially if they are part of a city-state that falls behind technologically.

of the three, only the first one offers hope of a high standard of living for all of the citizens… the second offers amazing short-term stability and happiness at the cost of any hope for a long term, and the third guarantees real oppression for a select group of individuals. one only hopes that the outside group gets eaten by wolves before they really start applying the thumbscrews.

In the end, everyone hangs from a lamppost, or starves to death. Well, except the ones protected by real wealth or the strong arm of a ruthless male warrior. At least men will be appreciated in small doses.

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Aaron January 25, 2014 at 06:39

“A lot of people mistake it for that because they see a lot of Jews among these new aristocrats, but these are Jews by ancestry only, and they are essentially indistinguishable from their gentile colleagues.”

These modern secular Jews that are of the Leftist Progressive variety are mostly affiliated with the Reform Branch of Judaism or they are non-affiliated. The estimates are that Jewish-born members of the Reform Branch have intermarried with gentiles at up to 75%. Probably a significant percentage that helps the statistics for any Reform growth can be contributed to the non-Jewish born partner or spouse ie gentile-born that has also joined mostly I think to make their spouse happy. As Bill wrote above, the ones being written about are Jews by ancestry only. Their real religion is usually the modern secular cult of self-worship or the modern Democratic Party. The children of mixed Reform Jew and gentile practice some form of Judaism at a rate of only one in four of the children probably Reform or non-affiliated. Most or all of their offspring will not practice.

Moral of the story is that liberalism is self-destructive and to continue it requires converts or help, transfusions of a sort, from outside itself to continue surviving. It is kinda funny that one can say the same about socialism: it can only continue to exist in the dominant role of a society until it runs out of other people’s money.

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artist January 25, 2014 at 08:59

Great post.

I see this phenomena at work in my own life by way of a couple of vectors.

First, I’m a subcontractor who works for an NGO founded and run by a mid-level global elite. The boss is an elite who is training graduate students to enter that world. Some do and some don’t. But they see themselves as part of a “middle kingdom”, possessing of all the correct attitudes and striving for a New Word Order. They are aware, perhaps acutely, of the great unwashed. But they are unaware of themselves. And they will pull the unwashed into a new world whether they like it or not.

Second, I married into a NYC-based Jewish family. My wife is an apostate to them, having fled NYC and the cultural Marxism that infest them. My brother-in-law is an Ivy educated Brooklyn-dwelling DWL who works for an NGO. He has two daughters attending an Ivy. They move effortlessly through a yuppie world that is oh-just-so, floating above it all. They are radical Obamaites proselytizing for policies that are extremely destructive to the yeoman class. One of the main distinguishing characteristics of the NYC crowd is their extreme hatred of the provinces. They sit in their high-rise dwelling and brownstones and read and watch hit pieces and exposes on all of the unwashed’s bad habits (guns, God, NASCAR, Walmart, etc..) and dream up easy to bring us to heel. Furthermore, these early 20th century immigrants take great delight in being Yankees of 1865. Me, I’m an outlier for having been born just 3 miles on the wrong side of the Mason-Dixon line. When in their presence I gazed at the nieces and consider that their place-of-birth and Ivy cred will position them as concentration camp administrators deciding the fate of my children. Of course, these people are the center of their own universe, and while they hate hate hate, they are unaware of their hate. They also consider themselves patriotic.

Thirdly, I find myself, professionally, ethnically, religiously in an odd space. For you see racially and ethnically I belong to one of the former core groups of the democrats and the left; I’m second generation, Irish-Catholic, blue-collar, union-organizing, political family east-coaster. I fulfilled my father’s desire. I got education and became a professional. An artist to boot. who is more cool and lefty then an artist? This allows me to see and feel two conflicting things: people assume I’m a flaming lib and therefore speak freely and vomit their ahistorical ignorance in front of me; but at the same time due to my maleness, my perceived Catholicism, the fact that the Irish are no longer popular among the elites, I am constantly “put in my place” by lib peers and by my non-prejudiced NY Red Diaper Jewish in-laws. One goes to the “race is a social construct” except hen it’s not. I have to add that I am not young. I have had white women conduct these liberal attacks on me in the workplace since the late 70s. Funny, they assume I’m one of them, but launch attacks from they sisterhood in order to weaken a man’s status and position, put him on the defensive, and gather their own power. All while lecturing about equal rights.

Self awareness. Quite a thing.

By the way Mr. Price, my son moved to Seattle 3 years ago and has put down roots. I’ll be visiting once a year from here on out. I enjoy your insights into the cultural nuances of the region. Being a lover of backcountry I keep my time in the city to a minimum. I’ve seen first hand the schism between the urbanites and the outdoors people, especially this rout on the peninsula.

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ron January 25, 2014 at 10:16

It’s time for us to admit that we have no place in their world, and set about removing them from ours.

Heartbreaking.

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W.F. Price January 25, 2014 at 10:48

Thirdly, I find myself, professionally, ethnically, religiously in an odd space. For you see racially and ethnically I belong to one of the former core groups of the democrats and the left; I’m second generation, Irish-Catholic, blue-collar, union-organizing, political family east-coaster.

-artist

My dad’s family was the West Coast version of the same.

By the way Mr. Price, my son moved to Seattle 3 years ago and has put down roots. I’ll be visiting once a year from here on out. I enjoy your insights into the cultural nuances of the region. Being a lover of backcountry I keep my time in the city to a minimum. I’ve seen first hand the schism between the urbanites and the outdoors people, especially this rout on the peninsula.

You should really visit east of the mountains — places like Leavenworth, Winthrop, Spokane, etc. The inland West is a breath of fresh air. It’s almost like a foreign country where people are nicer, more modest, trusting, open and egalitarian. I’m a forests/mountains/sea type of person, but when I want a break from the fascist politics of Seattle I can just head east and drive for a couple hours, and I’m in a different world.

artist January 25, 2014 at 12:12

Bill,

I intend to get to those places. I was up at the Mt. Baker area on my last visit, but that’s probably not what you’re talking about.

A couple years we flew in and out of Spokane on our way to Glacier Montana. We were very very impressed with Spokane as well as the areas in Idaho we passed through.

My step-children are hipsters and live in a West Philly ghetto. They keep pretending nothing goes wrong. And when there’s burglary they cheerily call it redistribution. I’ve heard University of Penn professors say the same thing. They act like it’s the weather, as if one lives in Miami so expect it tone hot. Since I was ethnically cleansed from my urban home in Wilmington, Delaware (now one of the shooting capitals of America) I just don’t understand it.

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W.F. Price January 25, 2014 at 12:40

@artist

I’d recommend renting a car and driving up to highway 20 in Skagit county, then east through the Cascades over Washington Pass. If you visit in the warmer months, that is — the pass is only open about 5-6 months out of the year. The views are spectacular, and on the other side there are beautiful little towns, rivers, lakes and valleys. If you want, you can drive a bit farther and visit the Okanogan National Forest, where you can spend time in some of the most remote wilderness in the lower 48. I highly recommend it.

Mt. Baker, Rainier and the Olympics are great, but the east side of the state is essential, too. The natural beauty makes me feel lucky to live here despite my reservations about the direction the culture is headed.

jay January 25, 2014 at 17:12

“A) Yeoman government. worked in the US for nearly 30 years after the revolution before the federalists finally managed to convince everyone that they could be the ruling elite. Yeoman government HAS to be controlled strictly through paring down and refreshing the rulers from among the yeomen… good methods of doing so are requiring land ownership to vote, requiring military service (with tightly controlled prerequisites) , or some sort of meritocracy… this government works wonders for egalitarianism, and is almost perfect for that sort of fantasy, which is why it is utterly abhorrent to egalitarians… without an oppressed majority, egalitarianism cannot exist.”

Yet Women’s suffrage and universal suffrage inevitably came. Leading to modern Authoritarian socialist government.

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Dan the man January 25, 2014 at 20:22

@Artist Keep posting here, it is good to know first hand that what I suspect is really true. Bye, from the Walmart end of world here in Texas.

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Aaron January 26, 2014 at 09:07

I have been living in NYC within an Orthodox Jewish community for the past five months. It is my first experience living in NY, ever being in NYC, and socializing with the orthodox. My best guess estimate is that 90% of them, especially the men, do not like Obama. They also do not like the modern liberal elites and the attitudes and values that go along with the Left. The political areas the orthodox do seem to ‘share’ with the left are support for social programs that support the poor, hungry, homeless, the need for job training and education, etc. Besides those, the orthodox are very right of center.

During Friday night’s shabbos dinner, I sat next to a Jewish convert from Oklahoma (an ex-Army engineer who like myself once owned the great Ruger SP101 .357 magnum revolver). Across from me at the table was a Jewish construction worker who loves guns and whiskey, and another young rabbinical student who wants to own guns and was very anti-marxist. I keep hearing with my connections through the Jewish pro-gun grapevine that increasing numbers of liberal Jews are buying guns.

You meet all types. Yes, those actual and wanna-be wealthy, ivory-tower, progressive-utopia stereotypical liberal elites are out there in NYC though I have not yet met any in NYC.

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artist January 26, 2014 at 14:57

Mr. Price,

Thanks for the recommendations. I intend to take all of that in.

and Dan the man, thanks for the compliment. Greeting from the People’s Republic of Maryland, home of Mayor Carchetti, er Governor O’Malley I mean. Eleven rounds makes you a criminal here.

Maryland rammed through new gun laws in the wake of Sandy Hook. The law took effect October 1, 2013. Between about March and September close to 300,000 so-called assault rifles were sold. The state, the gun dealers, stores in Delaware and Pennsylvania were overwhelmed.

Myself, I went to protests and picket lines for the first time in my life. I went to libertarian meetings. Within 1 month I was audited by the State of Maryland. Two weeks after I got my first notice the broader IRS scandal broke.

Let us consider that Dineesh D’Souza was just thrown in jail, and the remarks of Andrew Coumo and Chuck Shumer, and we can see the USA is morphing into an authoritarian police state.

Regarding Aaron’s post about the Orthodox, I can confirm my very liberal atheist Jewish in-laws hate hate hate the Orthodox.

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epoche* January 26, 2014 at 15:38

Indeed. But there is also a great deal of lack of awareness on the other side as well. Middle and working class Americans – what I like to call the American yeomanry – are not fully apprised of their own status, and imagine it to be higher than it truly is. They think the door is open to them through hard work and talent, and have little idea of the hostility the new aristocracy holds for them. They think there is common ground, but this is no longer so.

It’s time for us to admit that we have no place in their world, and set about removing them from ours.
———————————————
The prevailing narrative will not allow for any type of redress of our grievances because as white males we are the problem. The elite in this country banned intelligence testing in major organizations because it results in disparate impact so I dont think that we can count on the goodwill of our opponents. I dont know how this can be accomplished.

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Jaego January 26, 2014 at 19:29

If Judaism doesn’t matter, then why are there so many of them at Harvard and so few non-Jewish Whites? It does matter to them – even at the Reform level. And it only gets worse as you get into the Conservatives and Orthodox.

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Aaron January 27, 2014 at 05:27

Jaego,

Could you explain your comment above in more detail? I am not sure what you are trying to express based on what exactly? Thanks.

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epoche* January 27, 2014 at 07:35

I think the key thing that MRAs should focus on should be in getting rid of the doctrine of disparate impact or establishing a way to physically segregate ourselves from people who believe that such a doctrine is a legitimate method of addressing historical grievances as though historical grievances never occurred before in the history of mankind. Being asked to give up our privilege when many young white men have no social, moral or existential investment in society is absurd. Rosa Parks protested not sitting in the back of the bus she didnt get in peoples faces and tell others they had to move lest they be accused of racism and sexism.

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epoche* January 27, 2014 at 07:46

It gets even more interesting. What happens to the doctrine of disparate impact when private methods of credentialing start to occur gain traction?
https://www.coursera.org/specializations
http://openbadges.org/
I dont think that the courts nor social activists are prepared to deal with such inevitable conflicts.

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Jaego January 27, 2014 at 13:47

Mr Price tells us that the Elite are a Jewish/Anglo mix. But who is the senior partner? Whose culture was changed? Whose people are discriminated against? Aaron wanted to know if I knew. I do. And now you do too.

http://whitenewsnow.com/lounge-white-patriots/3932-truth-harvard-white-under-representaion.html

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Tam the Bam January 27, 2014 at 14:11

Aaron, hard to know. He’s being very coy and teasy.
Being foreign and all, more often than not I get the wrong end of the stick, but I think he’s betting all his baskets on one egg or something and assuming that English, or some degenerate creole thereof, will continue as the World Language beyond the next few decades. In the way that Latin did. Or didn’t.
Let’s face it, Qing dynasty mandarins were incredibly educated and civilized, and could have wiped the floor intellectually with any bumbling yokel of an English natural philosopher and empiricist.
But they didn’t. Because reasons and shit.

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Anonymous Reader January 27, 2014 at 14:37

It gets even more interesting. What happens to the doctrine of disparate impact when private methods of credentialing start to occur gain traction?

Certification via professional organization is already here in some niche fields.

http://en.wikipedia.or/wiki/Certified_Broadcast_Television_Engineer

In the US, the college degree has been used as a proxy for IQ testing since the 1970′s (See: “Griggs vs. Duke Power”) however the lowering of enrollment standards, grade inflation and the proliferation of useless degrees is having clear effects.

Finance also has its own certs, not just in the brokerage business but also in the financial planning field. Automotive mechanics, HVAC techs and other skilled labor also have various licensing and credential systems.

I wonder how long before something is set up to certify software engineers, perhaps a joint effort of IEEE and ACM? Sit for the exams, and get certified as a journeyman bit flipper, regardless of “college degree”. That would indeed throw a wrench into some machinery.

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Aaron January 27, 2014 at 19:21

Tam the Bam,

He’s just another angry anti-Semite to me. The degree and manner they exceed any possible legit criticism with their fanatical paranoia usually ends up being self-destructive to their claims.

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John South January 28, 2014 at 13:32

“I wonder how long before something is set up to certify software engineers, perhaps a joint effort of IEEE and ACM? Sit for the exams, and get certified as a journeyman bit flipper, regardless of “college degree”. That would indeed throw a wrench into some machinery.”

That’s been going on forever, software developers don’t need college degrees.

WTF a software “engineer” is or “bit flipper” I have no idea.

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mikediver January 29, 2014 at 07:24

In the world of finance and financial planning the idea of credentials outside of college always existed. However, in recent times these credentials have started to have an absolute requirement to have a degree in the field to be credentialed. Just think that A. Lincoln was a lawyer, having passed the bar, but never went to college. At that time passing the bar was all that was required. Now you can’t sit for the bar unless you have a law degree from an accredited college.

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dire badger January 29, 2014 at 23:31

No software company that is remotely successful in the private sector seriously considers programming degrees as an important entry requirement.hell, right now the best paid entry level position in the united states outside of federal charity it’s electricians apprentice, no education required.

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Anonymous Reader January 30, 2014 at 14:16

John South
That’s been going on forever, software developers don’t need college degrees.

Please tell that to the recent graduates I know who got jobs with Google, not to mention their new supervisors.

dire badger
No software company that is remotely successful in the private sector seriously considers programming degrees as an important entry requirement.

Really. Ok, I’ll ask a question.

When was the last time either one of you applied for a job in software, be it development or engineering? Not just a salaried position, say for IBM or Google or Microsoft or HP or TI or Oracle or SAP or some other multinational, but also contract work, or even subcontract work.

John South
WTF a software “engineer” is or “bit flipper” I have no idea.

Ah. Ok, that answers a question or two right there.

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dire badger January 31, 2014 at 16:13

@anon-

Applied for a job? Employer, not employee.I haven’t been an employee since 94. As a contractor, hover,I work with the industry constantly both here in Utah and in the bay and to a lesser extent silval area, not to mention a bunch of overseas stuff.
Yes, the big software giants are stool hiring college kids, and paying them twelve bucks an hour.serious developers, though, care only for achievement only

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dire badger January 31, 2014 at 16:14

Sorry for the typos, using my phone

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Anonymous Reader February 11, 2014 at 10:51

So what would you suggest to an 18 year old man who is good with mathematics and abstract thinking, if he wanted to work in the general field of software?

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Dire Badger February 13, 2014 at 03:27

right now? programming interfaces. drivers, simulators, and even actuarial software companies are desperately looking for really skilled coders, regardless of education
the problem is that gaming and graphic software are ‘super glam’. You can go broke trying to work for a big game house. If you HAVE to work on games, do it in your spare time, as an indy… Indies can make rent, even if they never get a ‘minecraft’ or ‘puzzle pirates’. And who knows? you might get lucky or figure out the perfect new casual game for the current audience.

I DO suggest, however, spending time way way outside the ‘geek culture’. that culture is supersaturated. Go camping, watch a basketball game, learn how to build a log cabin with your own two hands, try snowboarding… coding and gaming are awesome, but you need to develop outside experience in order to maximize your creativity and productivity.

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Anonymous Reader February 14, 2014 at 16:31

right now? programming interfaces. drivers, simulators, and even actuarial software companies are desperately looking for really skilled coders, regardless of education

Some of that looks like high level language work. If “driver” means “device driver” then does that still mean assembly-level coding? While a good coder should be able to work at any level, some people do better with higher level abstractions while others prefer the low level stuff.

the problem is that gaming and graphic software are ‘super glam’.

In some areas of research there is a crying need for coders who can take existing code and make it Go Fast on SIMD engines such as GPU’s. A graphics coder might be able to do that, because of the GPU’s in question, but understanding the algorithm would matter just as much.

Of course, I’m asking on behalf of a hypothetical 18 year old man who is considering whether to go to Enormous State U for 4.5 years or just start coding. So there’s a bit of a ‘moving target’ involved here.

You can go broke trying to work for a big game house. If you HAVE to work on games, do it in your spare time, as an indy… Indies can make rent, even if they never get a ‘minecraft’ or ‘puzzle pirates’. And who knows? you might get lucky or figure out the perfect new casual game for the current audience.

I would agree with the “in your spare time” part because gaming, like phone apps, is a really crowded field and it is difficult to stand out, unless someone happens to be the next “minecraft” or “angry birds” coder.

However, this isn’t getting to my question. Let’s say a young man is in high school and bored with the “computer science” class that consists of “turtle programming” or something else infantile. In your opinion what should he tackle for a start. K&R C, Python, Ruby, Java, C#, C++ or something else.?

Each programming language was constructed to deal with a certain collection of problems, and so tends to lead a coder to think in one set of ways rather than another. The days of teaching people to code with GWBasic are gone (mercifully), so what should a young man with some aptitude for abstract thinking consider as a tool?

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Dire Badger February 15, 2014 at 14:51

Short answer, pick a ‘field’ rather than a language. If you are going to compete in the oversaturated pure software field, skip the schooling and learn as many languages as you can, build a fat portfolio of apps (even minecraft/halflife mods, spreadsheets(Yeah I know), and ‘loaders’ can help)

But for right now, even four years as an apprentice plumber is more likely to pay off in the next twenty than a software design degree. When I say the field is oversaturated, I REALLY mean it… it’s like a fish in a horde of gulls… every week there’s a new hot opportunity, and unemployed coders are on it en-masse, and the very next week a score of projects are ‘finished’ and all the coders contracts expire. It’s worse than construction.

Electrical Engineering, Aerospace, Civil engineering, computer engineering degrees are more worth your time, since even in an unstable future the knowledge and value imparted are likely to be useful. (Not architectural engineering, though… I got my degree in that nearly twenty years ago and have never earned a dime from it.)

I had a lot more advice (deleted), but realized that most of it was less general and more about competing for software contracts in the slc/sival/bay area. Probably not what you are interested in unless you plan to become an entrepreneur.

I would say spend some time in the military before making a final decision, but the military that exists today is NOT the one that existed when I was young.

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Anonymous Reader February 21, 2014 at 10:01

Thanks for the observations, Dire Badger. You point to a larger problem that none of us can address, we can just try to cope with it: the New Economy. Briefly, there is more labor than paying work, whether it’s fry cook at the Anaheim fast food joint or coder in the Bay Area, or engineer for Huge Mulinational for that matter.

You raise an interesting point regarding skilled trades. One of the real deal millionaires I know is a plumber. He’s a smart plumber, he tested high in the Army years ago, then started college and dropped out. Of all the big houses on his street it is likely his is the only one paid off.

The problem my hypothetical 18 year old man has in terms of paying work is the competition, as you pointed out. It’s not just in the Bay area, either. Plenty of companies (cough**Micro$oft**cough**Google**cough) are willing to hire H-1B indentured servants for $50K / year, turn down brand new US college grads, and then whine to Congress about a “labor shortage”. I point to the most recent Facebook acquisition as an example: the two men who created that company applied to work at FB and were rejected. Probably “too old” and some other factors probably screened them out of FB’s HR process. Yet their work was worth $1 billion to FB last week…

Southwest Airlines announced it was hiring cabin crew, and got 10,000 online applications in a matter of hours. A couple of years back an immigration raid in Georgia shut down a meat packing plant because virtually all the employees were illegal aliens. When the plant announced it was hiring, people lined up for blocks just to apply.

The New Economy certainly does fix the ‘servant problem’ for the upper class.

Returning to the aspiring code monkey, that advice to pick a field rather than a language is certainly sound and valuable. Being able to write coherent, clear paragraphs explaining things is useful as well, given how poorly modern Americans are taught composition. He’s still going to have to compete with offshore coders, H-1B’s and other newbies.

In the larger picture, a number of major decisions over the last N years, where N = 4, 8, 20, 28, etc. means my aspiring nerd will have to work hard to get sharp and also to stay sharp, in any technical field, because one way or another it’s a world wide market.

Thanks again for the observations.

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Dire Badger February 21, 2014 at 10:34

Welcome. I understand that there are some areas like eastern europe that are definitely welcoming skilled coders. They want to start competing in the global software wars, but their local population base doesn’t have the needed background or high-tech skill base. of course, it DOES take a willingness to brave the third world wilds, meet nice slender polish or hungarian girls instead of bloated murican welfare queens, and leave behide the padded confines of job instability and male repression, but the sacrifice may be worth it…

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Anonymous Reader February 21, 2014 at 20:38

So this is how some of the H-1B fraud works…

http://www.cringely.com/2013/07/18/so-thats-how-h-1b-visa-fraud-is-done/

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