Ken Kesey and the old Northwest

by W.F. Price on December 17, 2012

I picked up Ken Kesey’s Sometimes a Great Notion over the weekend, and read the book in my spare time. It’s a novel about an Oregon logging community back in the mid-20th century. Although that isn’t my family background (my Western forefathers were miners and urban working men — more like Jack London), it’s pretty close, and it brought back memories of logging towns we’d often pass through on our family trips when I was a boy. By the 1980s, the culture Kesey describes in the book was already in steep decline; by now it serves as little more than a romantic setting for vampire books. Logging is a lot more systematic and better managed these days, largely out of necessity. The old growth forests have been shaved down for the most part, and what’s left can only be profitable with a scientific application of forestry management, so the “gyppo loggers” of old (small, private operations) are out of business. The only comparable industry in the region today is fishing — crabbing in particular.

Sometimes a Great Notion is a difficult read. It almost requires some intimate knowledge of the old Northwest to understand it and to make sense of the characters, so I wouldn’t recommend it to everyone. However, it offers a portrait of America in transition that can provide a good deal of understanding of contemporary culture and family.

Above all, the book is about family, and how the westward march of progress and industry across the continent chewed right through the fragile families that took root in its path. Not only were majestic forests and towering mountains little more than obstacles to be chopped down or blasted through, but human relationships as well. It was all about work and money, doing battle with nature and just struggling to hang on in the face of roaring, fire-driven progress.

In hindsight, it looks as though the cultural revolution of the 1960s may have been the first step in taming that beast. The nature-worship, the “dropping out” and the prioritization of love were in direct opposition to the prevailing culture of Western America of the mid 20th century. The typical man of the time was hard, brutal and defiant — not sensitive, thoughtful and caring. It might be tempting to compare the masculinity of the time favorably with today’s, but those in my father’s generation were often deeply resentful of their own fathers, who knew little more than the value of a hard day’s work at the factory, in the forest or on the sea. Fatherhood to them was nothing more than putting meat on the table and raising the boys to do the same, using whatever methods they deemed expedient (hence the origin of contemporary family law, which is really a child of the Age of Industry). It was a transitional time that was hard on young men, and some of the misbehavior the “liberation” from the old ways engendered is understandable in that light.

Sometimes, when we look at problems we face today, it’s tempting to blame a few people, or some particular group for causing the problem. In the case of the destruction of the family, however, I don’t think we can pin the blame entirely on feminists, or any other political group for that matter. That isn’t to say they have no responsibility for what’s happened, but they’ve been opportunists more than anything else. They were riding a wave that has been in motion for two centuries now. It’s a wave we couldn’t have escaped even without them, and it’s one we’re going to have to deal with whether they remain a political force or not.

{ 32 comments… read them below or add one }

oddsock December 17, 2012 at 17:35

I think there will be many guys that can identify with some part or other of your article, depending mostly on his age.

My own Father had quite a harsh childhood with little schooling, into borstal and then boy soldier. His main role was as a provider with a simple view or mantra of “If you don’t work you don’t eat”. Forcing myself and Brothers to learn a trade straight from leaving school. This in itself had mixed blessings with some much later unpredicatable lessons.

I was probably in the last batch of the traditional apprenticeships in the UK. When I look back it was quite a difficult period very strict poor money and grim conditions. I could tell you many a tale.
Late back to college or late for night class a bit cheeky with a Teacher? The Forman would be waiting for you the next day to give you a major bollocking. The college having phoned him and sometimes even your parents. It was not unheard of for the ” gaffa” or your journeyman to give you a kick up the arse or a thick ear to ” put you back in your place” or any other assorted torture to teach you a lesson. Some quite horrific.

Years later I found myself Lecturing to the young apprentices about my ” learning curve ” and treatment. I was even quite proud of what excellent craftsmen the UK once produced. It was a simple comment made by one of the Apprentices that really shocked me into reality. He said “More fool you then for putting up with it”.

So you see Mr Price, the system and harsh lifestyle you mention is not a million miles away from observations of my Father and my own experience as an apprentice. In a nutshell, yes I was a good craftsman and trained to be a good provider but little else. Perhaps trained for a byegone age?

In hindsight, perhaps the apprentice I mentioned above along with the young guys of today have a valid point when they reject such old style conditioning ? Maybe they realize its a shite deal ? Hopefully !

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Norm December 17, 2012 at 17:43

Built by miners and loggers (like Frisco) then the libs move in and oppose all what created the northwest.

Off topic, but in feminist Sweden, 37 yo women convicted of having sex with skeleton. The over 30 feministas are getting desperate.
http://www.thelocal.se/45120/20121217/#.UM-xcuRQS8A

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3DShooter December 17, 2012 at 17:55

@Welmer

“Above all, the book is about family, and how the westward march of progress and industry across the continent chewed right through the fragile families that took root in its path.”

First I’d like to say that your pic`s of the weekend with the kids was great. This past weekend was one where holding your kids close was important.

For me, the only real belief I’ve held (I eschew relgion/gov’t/ideologies in general) is family – it was the only ‘sacred’ belief I’ve had. Long time readers of you blog know I’m an atheist, but the ONE thing I believed in was family. The state destroyed that one belief and I no longer have any allegiance to the state.

I suppose I am a relic from a time that vaguely remember’s when the values that men have held were revered. My father related to me taking pack-trains of mules across Lolo pass into Montana before the highway’s were built. On his death bed he spoke of harnessing up a team of mules . . . I feel I’m rapidly approaching that state of incongruence with modern society – one that my computer skills were a part of (over 50, you’re out). Maybe that is just the way of life . . .

Unless men can re-claim their families from the state we will lose this war. For those that have read the ‘Ten Plank’s of the Communist Manifesto’ you already know this.

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El Bastardo December 17, 2012 at 18:50

They were riding a wave that has been in motion for two centuries now. It’s a wave we couldn’t have escaped even without them, and it’s one we’re going to have to deal with whether they remain a political force or not.

I have said the same thing; however I think their is a financial group at odds with this, and they co opted it in the 60′s to better insulate the fed’s fiat inflation scam. Feminism was ideal in that it laced really well into Social Security; enough to hook people in as if it ever had anything more than a temporary flair of legitimacy. Followed by a very strong aftertaste to let those who could figure it out that it was not something good they were drinking. I say it all the time, feminism is not the source; merely a symptom.

The year of 2012 is almost gone; and quite possibly the last vestiges of moral influence with it before a recession comes and maybe wakes us all the hell up.

Honestly I have always appreciated your thoughtful, and well written point of view. It is always refreshing to read, and why I keep coming back. I can come off as a severe sarcastic asshole; I am! But I do appreciate fairness, honesty, and well thought out, well researched criticism that does not act the drug riddled surfer riding the wave of popular influence.

I won’t read the book as I am not that familiar with the Northwest; beautiful country you live in though.

Your view of family; I am similar to yours maybe, maybe not. Yet I don’t believe we are ever going to have traditional family as we know it. Divorce has finished the families the way the industrial revolution failed to. I hope I am wrong, but many men are angry; I hope a counter balance blows this all away. I just don’t see it; divorce has been such a terrible scar, and the emotional damage will potentially take decades to heal. What feminism, being used by the fed (at least that is my POV), has done is maybe too far gone for at least the next several generations to completely heal from. We may not see a true return to more normal families for 20 or more years.

We just love destroying each other too much; and have 70% of the world’s attorneys to help us do it better.

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brigadon December 17, 2012 at 19:37

This is one the reasons that I read Ted Kazinscky’s essays. The man might have been a sociopath, but one cannot deny that he was highly intelligent. He saw humanity and technological industry as directly antithetical states.

I am not with him in believing that ‘technology’ in general is antithetical to humanity, but I strongly support the idea that the industrial revolution has taught us everything we need to know, and it’s time to put it aside… just like, once their purpose has been served, EVERY ‘revolutionary’ movement must be ended. Improvements in the science of food production, clothing, and those labor-intensive and barely-productive industries of the past have rendered ‘industrialized’ mass market products virtually obsolete with a few minor exceptions, such as raw materials. This over reliance on mass production of finished goods (as opposed to raw materials) is the fuel that drives mass corporatism, groupthink, socialism, mass market commercialism, and destroys individuality.

Don’t get me wrong, I have no interest in returning to the era of sunup to sundown slavery and dying early due to overwork trying to wrest raw materials from the ground and sea, but with industrialized production of raw materials, I would like to see ‘finished goods’ returned to the handiwork of individuals that enjoy those labors, and the financial logic to make such work profitable and affordable. And it IS possible.

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Paul Murray December 17, 2012 at 19:48

And the “gyppo” crabbers will do to the crabs precisely what the loggers did to the trees. Whole swathes of the ocean floor have been literally swept clean by nets.

Cue “Downeaster Alexa”.

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Rob December 17, 2012 at 19:49

I’ve known many loggers in my lifetime, and it is truly sad that the big-time operations have crowded out the small time ones.

There was a certain sense of pride that I’ve seen lots of men go through, getting into logging. It IS tough and dangerous work, and I’ve known a few who have died badly. One man in my church was “barber-chaired.” That is when a tree faller cuts down a tree, but at the last minute, while falling, the tree shifts on its axis and suddenly falls in a different direction and the stump of the falling tree shoots off of the stump in an unexpected direction, hits the logger, and pretty much literally takes the man’s head off. Another guy I know, who was my own age, worked late one night bucking some logs at the landing, and the log pile shifted and slid on top of him, pinning him underneath and leaving him to die alone in the cold night with a few hundred pounds of log on-top of his chest. I know another, a truck driver, whose logs were too heavy on the truck coming around a mountain pass, and his truck went over the edge, plummeting down a several hundred foot cliff. His son worked for him driving another truck, and was one of the first people on the scene. I was in school with the son when I was younger. It was really sad.

But, on the other hand, I’ve also known lots of men who have pulled themselves up by their bootstraps via logging. Lots of men started in logging by being a buckerman. This involves “bucking” the ends of fallen trees to a certain length, then chainsawing off all the protruding branches, and finally, when the line skidder came around, he would be the one to wrap the cable around the tree for the “skidder” to drag out of the bush to the log pile for the trucks to pick up. Buckerman is entry level work for logging, but, it was still work that a man could make $50,000/yr, without an education, back in the 1990′s. Lots of men took this route where I grew up.

After being a bucker-man for a few years, lots of guys bought their own skidders, and self contracted, thus becoming self-employed, and then vaulted themselves into better positions by buying more or better equipment. Back in the 1990′s, you could buy a used line-skidder for around $30,000-$50,000, hire a greenhorn buckerman to buck and hook lines for you. However, by the late 1990′s, line-skidders were replaced by grapple skidders. As you can see, it has a big “grapple” at the front which picks up and carries the logs to the landing, rather than having them “skidded” along the ground there. This was the first strike against the small-time logger. There was no more need for bucker-men to hook up the lines, and tree-fallers (the highest paid, most dangerous work in the bush) were replaced by processors, which essentially mosey up to a tree, “grapple” the trunk with their hydraulic arm (which contains a saw), the tree would be cut – specifically to length, and then it would “process” the log’s branches by running it through itself, stripping off all the branches. Thus, the bucker-man’s job was destroyed completely, and many people never entered into logging again, as the entry level positions were all removed. Also, the smaller operators, who used to buy the old-fashioned line-skidders for $30-$50,000 could not afford to buy the new grapple skidders which cost $250,000.

Thus, the whole industry, in British Columbia, has over the past 20 or so years, changed from something which any man had a shot at succeeding in – with enough hard work – into one where it became all about capital investment. Lots of those small time operators used to handsomely support their families by becoming small-time logging contractors… but now that big machines and big capital has invaded, those jobs no longer exist. Logging is still a big industry in BC, but now it supports big business and big money, while squeezing out the small guy. It is sad, truly, because so many men supported their families and their communities by doing this work that is no longer available to them, as well as the long term financial security many achieved by investing relatively small amounts of capital in becoming self-employed.

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etype December 17, 2012 at 20:10

Very perceptive article. I’m continually surprised by the depth of Price’s insight. It is vital that the men’s movement matures beyond shadenfreude over feminist stupidity…we can take that for granted. What we need more of is what we do, use our brains to understand and overcome. Price’s article is encouraging.

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realist December 17, 2012 at 22:10

This writing is deep and beautiful.

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Poiuyt December 17, 2012 at 22:17

One word describes it all: WASTE !

An absolute, total and remorseless waste that’s so thorough-going, unrelenting and disproportionate to notional returns only fractionally gained in it’s creation !

This biblical scale waste of natural, human and man made resources cannot be sustained neither recovered from, even in a hundred generations.

If there was anything primitive societies knew better than we, it was the life and land sparing art/craft of CONSERVING.

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will December 17, 2012 at 22:56

@Poiuyt

What the hell are we going to do with all the rubbish that we have created?

So far much goes to the bin and put in a landfill.

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KNZ December 17, 2012 at 23:20

Thanks for the review, it looks like a book I’d enjoy – the comments on fatherhood in the past is very pertinent. As always, there was never a golden age, losses and gains always accompany social change.

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Poiuyt December 18, 2012 at 00:31

“”” Will [Price ?]
December 17, 2012 at 22:56
@Poiuyt

What the hell are we going to do with all the rubbish that we have created? So far, much goes to the bin and put in a landfill.”””

What also, are we going to do with all the damaged/discarded synthetic products, the damaged/discarded ecologies and the damaged / discarded humans living in that damaged habitat we’ve created ?

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Pirran December 18, 2012 at 02:07

A great summation of the period when America was just on the cusp of that transition is John Steinbeck’s “Travels with Charley”.

Steinbeck set out on a journey of exploration of his native land in 1960 (Charley was a large poodle that accompanied him everywhere) in a DIY Winnebago (actually a converted pick-up) and recorded his thoughts in meticulous detail. The old America was still there, but he documented the change (often at breakneck speed) all around him.

One of Steinbeck’s best and still one of my favorite travel books. You can pick it up in paperback or on Kindle.

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AAB December 18, 2012 at 02:41

Speaking of Ken Kesey novels, do you know of any manosphere sites that have written a review of One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest? I’ve read it recently and it seems to have strong pro-male & anti-feminist memes in it: Nurse Ratched as the uber-evil matriach, MacMurphy as the undomesitcated Alpha come to liberate/unplug the emasculated men from the system/matrix, Billy Bibitt as the over-mothered neurotic male etc.

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freebird December 18, 2012 at 05:00

@rob-
Thanks for the excellent post on the logging industry,I’ve seen the exact same thing in Michigan,the end result being no more old growth forest,and smaller and smaller ‘breeder’ oaks cut off,leaving just the scrub poplar to take over.

They claim it takes 50 years for the poplar to thin out due to over crowding and then a small oak has a chance to begin growing as it can now get the sunlight.
So,even in the best scenario it would be 200 years to replace what is now gone.
Most notably is the lack of re-planting.
Michigan is said to be 50 years behind on the re-planting agreement,it seems it’s just lip service,no one wants to eat into those timber profits by purchasing and tending young oaks.

The whole logging industry post would serve well as a general metaphor for most hands on type occupations for young men.

If a young man was to ask me what field to go into for genuine opportunity I would be at a loss to answer him.

As the technology increases it takes a higher intellect to keep up with it,(R&D)something the vast majority of the population is likely incapable of doing.

What’s needed is those entry and skilled labor jobs for the common man.

Global outsourcing,robots,Union breaking,and the economic downturn seems to be leaving very little to find in the way of jobs.

Good point on the value of family being diminished in the post modern society.
Antiquated concepts such as family belonging to each other (Christian ownership theory) have been overturned.

So what is left?

The pursuit of a dollar by service industries to the top %10,or the pursuit of money by usury and paperwork scams?

It’s true men have derived their worth and identity from what they did for a living.
It would be easier to find the new identity of ‘man-being’ while also being able to put food on the table.

When there’s no food on the table it’s hard to concentrate on much else.

Advice for young men today?
I do not know,I am of the dreaded boomer generation.

My dad was 16 before the farm he grew up on got electricity or telephone.

He used to do stuff like carrying water by hand from a hand-pump.

With today’s technology the women no longer need us to carry the water.

Seems the three last valued jobs are:
1.Military
2.Police
3.Fire

Anybody else is up for the chopping.

So get on in there and risk your lives,it is the only occupation that has not been taken away,(or heavily diminished) either by greed or by gender war.

Good luck playing the stock market!
That game is rigged against the common man also.

Con-games from wall to wall these days,nothing but scam after scam sucking the last bit of equity out of the system.

The system is set up to see that the assets of the boomer generation go to the State and not the next generation.
(eating the seed,salting the fields)

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meistergedanken December 18, 2012 at 05:03

Poiuyt wrote: “If there was anything primitive societies knew better than we, it was the life and land sparing art/craft of CONSERVING.”

Not so; if that were true then Mesopatamia would still look like the Garden of Eden, and the Aborigines (who set massive uncontrolled fires to hunt and extinguish all the big game animals) wouldn’t have turned the entire Australian continent into a desert. And Iceland would still be covered in forests and have arable soil. Human nature doesn’t change through the ages. Once the population density and ensuing strain on the regional resources exceeds the ability of contemporary technical knowledge, disaster ensues.

Don’t believe the myth of the Noble Savage. He was just too incompetant to satisfy his material cravings. On the other hand, maybe you would prefer some of those really primitive matriarchel societies where we would still be in grass huts, but then why would you be frequenting this website?

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meistergedanken December 18, 2012 at 05:28

Rob -
Great comment. I always like to learn the “inside scoop” on why and how industries change. It reminds me of when steel construction in the 1950′s switched over from having a four-man team installing rivets to one guy simply putting in bolts.

Remember when the future was supposed to be totally awesome because the common man would be freed from all this “mind-numbing” distasteful labor and everyone would have plenty of time for recreation? Well, we certainly have free time all right – being unemployed.

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Sasha December 18, 2012 at 07:32

I don’t agree with WF Price about how fathers were in the previous generation.

See ‘Myth of the Tyrannical Dad’ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/8744135.stm

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Ode December 18, 2012 at 07:57

Remember when the future was supposed to be totally awesome because the common man would be freed from all this “mind-numbing” distasteful labor and everyone would have plenty of time for recreation?

Technological gains can be used for one of either two things:
1) work less hours and enjoy whatever you have now
2) work the same amount but use the efficiency gains to buy more consumer goods

We all know what choice was made.

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Mikediver December 18, 2012 at 08:16

You should all read Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut; published in 1952. It extends the current (and obviously the past) trends in automating the worker out of the work to their ultimate dystopian results.

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Opus December 18, 2012 at 09:23

I once met a guy (at a legal dinner in London) who claimed he knew Kesey. Kesey who died recently is the main subject of Tom Woolf’s novel-like Electric Kool Aid Acid Test. Far out man.

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keyster December 18, 2012 at 09:53

In the case of the destruction of the family, however, I don’t think we can pin the blame entirely on feminists, or any other political group for that matter.

The great pull and push between liberty, self-reliance/individual responsibility and large tyrannical government/welfare state has been going on since Plato’s Republic and the perfect society.

Alexis de Tocqueville provides the most valuable insight into the pitfalls leading towards “Soft Tyranny” – which can be traced from Lincoln and the great war over state’s rights – to socialist Teddy Roosevelt – to Wilson who implemented his policies – to FDR and the New Deal (social security) – to LBJ and The Great Society (medicare/medicaid) – and present day to ObamaCare (“affordable health insurance for all”).

When you wage a war against the hetero-normative Christian white male – the backbone of the family unit and society for millenia – and replace him with government (equality laws, immigration laws and welfare), the family will cease to exist and society will collapse. It’s happening right now in case you haven’t noticed.

We have no God, we have no association with community, no male role models for our boys in school and no fathers in the home. What could possibly go wrong? The nuclear family could collapse and we could just keep implementing more laws to protect ourselves from what we caused in the first place. That’s Soft Tyranny. That’s the plan. And it’s happening so slowly we can’t see it before our very eyes.

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JudgyBitch December 18, 2012 at 10:10

I live in a rural, fairly isolated community and one thing that separates folks into distinct groups is self-sufficiency. It doesn’t have to be brutal or even all encompassing. Making your own bread, hunting, fishing, providing even a small portion of your own food, knitting, chopping wood – those kinds of things seem to go hand in hand with a functioning family unit.

I interact with lots of different families and people, and I have definitely noticed that the families who provide for even a tiny portion of their own welfare and A) more stable, and B) more grateful to their menfolk.

Ever try chopping a cord of wood? You’ll be longing for a strong back and biceps in no time, trust me. Kindling is about all I can manage. And when you want that wood brought it, you think carefully about whether it’s worth bitching about whatever blah blah blah. When you rely on someone else, you are more careful about how you treat that person. And that’s a two way street. My husband doesn’t have very many critical things to say when he’s hungry!

When all you ever do is go and buy the shit you need, pretty soon everything seems replaceable and disposable. Try making your mittens. You won’t be so quick to shrug off a missing one.

There’s something about PULLING together that makes people STAY together. I think that’s why a breadwinner/homemaker family model works so well. You need each other. That reliance forms the foundation of love. You just need each other.

Two income families don’t need each other. They’re easy to trash because there is no foundation of need.

IMHO

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W.F. Price December 18, 2012 at 12:43

I live in a rural, fairly isolated community and one thing that separates folks into distinct groups is self-sufficiency. It doesn’t have to be brutal or even all encompassing. Making your own bread, hunting, fishing, providing even a small portion of your own food, knitting, chopping wood – those kinds of things seem to go hand in hand with a functioning family unit.

-JB

Rural and industrial lifestyles are quite different. Fishermen, loggers and miners are typically townspeople. Some small town, some not so small. Their relationship with the land is more adversarial than symbiotic. Where they live is often not well-suited to farming, so you can’t necessarily blame them, but it’s a very different kind of lifestyle and philosophy from true rural. Where I live the differences are very stark depending on the community. For example, if you spend time in Darrington the atmosphere is very different from Lynden, despite the fact that they are only some 50 miles from each other. Darrington is a timber town settled largely by tarheels, whereas Lynden is a farming town settled by Dutch Calvinists (who settled in large numbers in the Frazier Valley). The former is a bit wild and rough (and hosts the best bluegrass festival in the state), while the latter is buttoned down and very socially conservative. One does battle with the land while the other shapes and fosters it. Needless to say, the rough loggers are a lot less “Christian” about their family formation and behavior than the Dutch farmers. Fishermen and miners are like the loggers. Kind of rough, wild men. There’s something about that lifestyle that just wrecks families. I think it’s one of the reasons the Northwest is so irreligious and feminist.

Rik Little December 18, 2012 at 13:02

Who’s to blame…Hmmm…One thing is for sure. The most evil of people for family problems and almost all other problems are the people behind the New World Order. And they are the ones who created Feminism in the 1960′s. I am writing a book about it and I will be naming names. It will be titled THE FEMINIST RAILROAD TO FATHERLESSNESS.

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Towgunner December 18, 2012 at 13:09

@ brigadon:

Those are really interesting points you make. Looking at our technology today and how fast it progresses it seems like anything is possible, and relative to previous times much is. But, I can’t help but notice the disconnection between the kind of technologies developed and the society that it engenders and the individual. I think the “wow” factor has clouded the minds of most people as to what’s really important. If we have all this great capability then why do we have to use it just to create a festering hive of collectivism that is matriarchal in nature…as if we’re all working ants/bees servicing the queen? We’re not just animals, much less insects, a better system that synthesizes the whole human not just the id, can be achieved very easily. The tragedy is that it’s all right there for us to take. If you look at the techno-nanny state where literally everything is recorded you realize the extent of the abuse of our great technology to be used against us…and we’re just getting started down this dark path.

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Towgunner December 18, 2012 at 13:12

@ Keyster:

Good post.

“We have no God, we have no association with community, no male role models for our boys in school and no fathers in the home. What could possibly go wrong?”

What could go wrong?? Oh I don’t know, maybe a sharp increas in the incidents of people, males and females, going bat-sh*t bazerk and killing everything around them?

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keyster December 18, 2012 at 14:13

What could go wrong?? Oh I don’t know, maybe a sharp increas in the incidents of people, males and females, going bat-sh*t bazerk and killing everything around them?

Thanks.
Oh but no – – access to assault rifles with large magazines and desensitization to violence through media exposure is the problem; because these are things the government can throw new laws at to remind everyone how truly benevolent government can be.

“We need action!”
“We need government to do something!”
“We need to sit down and have an open conversation about violence in our society today.”

God, community, male role models in our feminist indocrination centers, lack of fathers in the home (out of wedlock births, insta-divorce which rewards one half for doing so, single mothers outnumbering married mothers and fathers)….these are things the government can do little about because men and women are perfectly equal, with women being more equal than men.

Two income families don’t need each other. They’re easy to trash because there is no foundation of need.

It’s balance of need, and balance of value between each other.
If wife earns man’s money working at man’s job, why does she “need” husband?
Most of the men I know can’t even change a light bulb, let alone know what a cord of wood even is. When the Great Collapse occurs in the coming decades, you’ll want to be with a man who’s resourceful – – and as far from the major urban areas as possible. It’s gonna be messy.

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oddsock December 18, 2012 at 15:15

Rik Little

“THE FEMINIST RAILROAD TO FATHERLESSNESS”

Sounds fascinating. I look forward to reading it, as I am sure will many others.

I hope you mention in your book the conspiracy of the cultural marxist and socialist groups in all this? Most guys know full well it is all about corpartism and globalism and a move to a world bank etc, but a few will really spit their dummy out if you don’t make reference to some hint of some undercover global left wing plot to destroy America.
It will keep them happy for a while.

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Charles Martel December 18, 2012 at 21:09

JudgyBitch
Ever try chopping a cord of wood? You’ll be longing for a strong back and biceps in no time, trust me. Kindling is about all I can manage. And when you want that wood brought in, you think carefully about whether it’s worth bitching about whatever blah blah blah.

Women appreciate men more when they can see the work women depend on to keep them warm, feed them, etc., being done by a man right in front of them.

Men still provide everything women need but thanks to male technology all that work is now done remotely by some anonymous man that the woman can’t see. And with women it’s literally out of sight out of mind. So you’re a cubicle jockey and your labor pays for the food and the heat? Doesn’t count as teh wimminz can fill out the TPS reports just like you. But swinging an axe with your shirt off for a couple of hours? Catnip.

In my whitopian world I don’t need to do any physical labor but I continue to do some just for the effect it has on my wife, even if it’s just going outside to clean the gutters in a rainstorm.

The other day I threw a few rocks back on top of a dry stone wall. As I reached for the first one she started to tell me how they were too heavy. I could see her eyes widen a little as I picked up the first rock.

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Stick December 19, 2012 at 10:52

Kesey’s Sometimes a Great Notion is his best work. If you have not read it, then read it.

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