Women At Least As Likely As Men to Commit DV

by Elusive Wapiti on September 12, 2012

Source.  Click here to enlarge

Have been looking for this chart (right) for a while to support my claims that women commit 70% of non-reciprocal DV. What once was lost to the sands of teh interwebz, has now been found.

From the accompanying text [page 3 of this pdf]:

Women are at least as likely as men to engage in partner aggression.[6] A recent Centers for Disease Control survey of young adults found that in cases of one-way partner aggression,  women were the instigators in 71% of cases [7] (see Figure 1 [8]). Fewer than one in five cases of female violence are explained by the woman acting in self-defense. [9,10]

In at least half of all cases, partner violence is mutual.[11] “Several studies, including large and nationally representative samples, have found that the most prevalent pattern is mutual  violence,” explains family researcher Murray Straus.[12]

In most cases, partner aggression does not escalate. [13,14] If the conflict does turn into a full-scale altercation, the woman is more likely to be injured. Nonetheless, males represent 38% of persons who suffer physical injury from partner aggression. [15]

Domestic violence rates vary depending on the couple’s marital status. Among intact married couples, partner violence rates are quite low—only 0.9/1,000. [16] But among separated couples, partner violence rates rise sharply to 49.0/1,000—a 50-fold increase.

References:

6 McDonald R. Estimating the number of American children living in partner-violent families. Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 20, No. 1, 2006. http://smu.edu/experts/study-documents/family-violence-study-may2006.pdf

7 Whitaker DJ, Haileyesus T, Swahn M, Saltzman L. Differences in frequency of violence and reported  injury between relationships with reciprocal and nonreciprocal intimate partner violence. American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 97, No. 5, 2007.

8 Arehart-Treichel J. Men shouldn’t be overlooked as victims of partner violence. Psychiatric News Vol. 42, No. 15, August 3, 2007, page 31. http://pnhw.psychiatryonline.org/content/42/15/31.2.full

9 Follingstad D, Wright S, Lloyd S, and Sebastian J. Sex differences in motivations and effects in dating relationships. Family Relations, Vol. 40, 1991, pp. 51–57.

10 Carrado M, George MJ, Loxam E, et al. Aggression in British heterosexual relationships: A descriptive analysis. Aggressive Behavior, Vol. 22, 1996.

11 Whitaker DJ, Haileyesus T, Swahn M, Saltzman L. Differences in frequency of violence and reported
injury between relationships with reciprocal and nonreciprocal intimate partner violence. American Journal of Public Health, May 2007.

12 Straus MA. Gender symmetry in partner violence. In Lutzker JR, Whitaker DJ (eds.): Prevention of Partner Violence. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2008.

13 O’Leary K, Barling J, Aria I, et al. Prevalence and stability of physical aggression between spouses: A longitudinal analysis. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 57, 1989, pp. 263–268.

14 Feld S, Straus M. Escalation and desistance of wife assault in marriage. Criminology, Vol. 1, 1989. pp. 141–161.

15 Archer J. Sex differences in aggression between heterosexual partners: A meta-analytic review. Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 126, No. 5, 2000, pp. 651–680.


About the author: EW is a well-trained monkey operating heavier-than-air machinery. His interests outside of being an opinionated rabble-rouser are hunting, working out, motorcycling, spending time with his family, and flying. He is a father to three, a husband to one, and is a sometime contributor here at Spearhead. More of his intolerable drivel is available at the blog The Elusive Wapiti.

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