Book Review: Worthless

by Elusive Wapiti on July 3, 2012

The Book: Worthless — The Young Person’s Indispensable Guide to Choosing the Right Major, by Aaron Clarey, 173 pages.

Summary: Aaron. Clarey, aka Captain Capitalism, has penned a guide aimed straight at the 18-25 college demo.  This book’s title truthfully advertises what the reader will see inside…a straight-up practical guide to selecting a college major that will provide the student with the best odds for well-compensated employment after their stint in college is complete.

One key takeaway from this book is found in the opening pages, in a description of an exercise he used to give to his students (and therefore to the reader).  In one instance of this exercise, he invited his students to consider the items they were thinking of buying (cell phones, sports cars, flat screen TV, beer, etc….tangible widgets all).  Then he asked them their majors or planned majors, garnering the below responses:

Sociology x2
Women’s Studies
Electrical Engineering
Journalism x2
English
Engineering
Psychology x2
Education x2
Pre-law
Actuarial Science
Communications
Political Science x2
International Relations
Accounting
Philosophy
Music / Arts
“African-American” Studies
Pre-med
History

Mr. Clarey then contrasted the yawning mismatch between their liberal-arts fields of study with the goods and services they consume for his students.  For how does a sociology major (or journo, psych, poli sci, music, hyphenated-American, English major…you get my point) contribute to the design and production of a cell phone, the extraction of petroleum to fuel a sports car, or make or provide much anything of value that consumers demand?  The answer is, not much, if anything at all. And that is exactly the point.  Mr. Clarey writes:

The mismatch between what people want and the skilled labor required to build it makes it very clear the problems facing youth today.  [They] all want to have high-paying jobs, [they] all want to go to college, but [they] never give an ounce of thought to what is in demand. Most youth today major in what they want, not what other people demand.  This not only goes a long way in explaining why liberal-arts majors face high unemployment and low-paying jobs, but also explains why we have a trade deficit with the likes of China and India whose students do major in the fields that produce the goods we want. [emphasis in original]

Another takeaway from this book is bound to make American middle- and high-school students everywhere groan: you gotta learn the maths.  For math is the foundational component of all the STEM degrees that feed into high-paying jobs making the widgets that consumers buy.  But, Mr. Clarey cautions, “not all STEM degrees were created equal”, and one’s mathematical proficiency must be paired with another high-skill, low-density/high-demand component (i.e., chemistry, etc) if the STEM focus is to deliver on the investment.  He also warns readers away from those degrees that lack mathematical rigor, which include all lib-arts degrees and some degrees sometimes and erroneously lumped in with STEM, such as finance and architecture.

A third takeaway from this book is the folly in the cultural expectation that “winners” go to college while the dregs settle for trade school. Mr. Clarey pokes holes in this cultural norm, noting that while “you must go to college to be somebody” was good advice in the years after WWII when a tiny fraction of the labor force had college degrees. Unfortunately, there is a surfeit of  college degrees in America today, to the point where possession of a bachelor’s is functionally equivalent to having graduated from high school 60 years ago. As before, Mr. Clarey points to the supply-demand curve, notes bachelor’s degree market glut, grade inflation (i.e., the sheepskin has lost some of its meaning as an indicator of real learning and/or skills), and skyrocketing tuition, and recommends the trades as well-paying, in-demand, value-producing jobs that have the important benefit of being far cheaper than college.  Moreover, one can always go to college later, with all that money they saved by going to a trade school.

The fourth and final major takeaway from the book was where Mr. Clarey dispenses a bit of the “if I had to do it all over again” style of advice. He exhorts the young to enjoy college, by which he means study and do well but don’t overdo it in the process. He proffers the military as a way to garner skills, credibility, and (if you stick around for 20 years or more) a pension.  As the author contends that no-one really takes young adults seriously…and they’re paid low wages in accordance with their low levels of skills…until their mid- to late thirties, this option has the added advantage of returning one back into the private labor force as one enters their prime earning years  In addition, he advises those already working on worthless degrees to quit right away, consider the effort invested thus far as a sunk cost, and get cracking on a major that will actually service all those student loans.  Speaking of loans, he further recommends young people to avoid debt if they can, to spend some time in the labor force (so long as they return to school), to not worry about reasonable debt for a worthwhile degree (it’s an investment), consider a two-year degree program in lieu of a four, and / or start their own business on the side.  To this advice, Mr. Clarey also recommends prospective job seekers to bypass HR (where companies place troublesome worthless degree holders) and go directly to the hiring authority instead.  And last, the author advises students to be open-minded about employment overseas, in economically freer countries.

I found the author’s perspective of college-as-trade school to be interesting, for the academy has undergone a fundamental transformation in the 20th Century. What started as a way to transmit knowledge from one generation of learned men to the next during the Middle Ages has morphed into overpriced trade schools for the mass-man in the post-WWII age.  Indeed, the author is careful to largely avoid applying the “e” word–education–to these facilities of so-called higher learning in his book, for that is not what modern colleges are for or do, and not how Mr. Clarey advises the youth to view a college education anyways. Instead, in the author’s view, the purpose of attending a modern college is to acquire practical skills that will produce something that a consumer demands. Period.  This perspective underlays the author’s hard-nosed return-on-investment perspective on seeking a degree from the modern university…this rather than lofty and antiquated notions of men and women of culture acquiring a broad, liberal education.  And besides, how well do colleges do these days matriculating cultured, critically thinking, well-rounded citizens anyways?  Some think colleges close minds rather than open them.

It is in this re-purposed mission that the modern university does many things that don’t make much sense to the author. In fact, a portion of the book is a polemic against the education institution itself, an institution with revenues two and a half times larger than the entire oil industry in America.  This fact led the author to wonder aloud that if so-called “Big Oil” is, by dint of it’s size and scope, inherently exploitative of its customers, how is “Big Ed” not so?  Big Ed, in the author’s characterization, does not exist for the benefit of students but rather, like any large bureaucracy, it serves the teachers, administrators, executives, and the institution itself.  This while the data suggests a slight negative correlation between spending per student and academic achievement; one would think that if spending on education were truly “for the children”, we would see a slight (or better) positive correlation between increased spending and standardized test scores.  Instead, the only thing that is increasing is teacher and administrator salaries, far outpacing inflation.  Furthermore, Mr. Clarey also questions the need for prerequisites, and offers that the sheer number of prerequisites–see the university’s former mission of matriculating educated, well-rounded pillars of society, above–wastes students’ time and “generate[s] money for other departments, notably departments of worthless majors”, by ramming a captive student body through worthless classes taught by instructors who themselves were schooled in worthless majors. An economic term comes to mind regarding this sort of activity: ‘rent-seeking’, or the act of manipulating the rules so as to shunt economic activity one’s direction.

The author makes clear his antipathy for an institution that predates upon the young and naive.  But I find myself wondering, isn’t Big Ed just giving the customer what it demands, good and hard?  Were not Mr. Clarey’s classes filled with students who signed up for worthless majors, with only a sprinkling of STEM students?  Why then would it not make sense for universities tilt toward supplying a “product” for this admittedly misguided and economically foolish demand?  Moreover, these days apparently demand for STEM is so weak that some colleges think hard about eliminating STEM programs while others actually do so.  (To be fair, a few colleges like this one are drop-kicking worthless degrees too).  In an age of declining male enrollment and overwhelming female predilection for non-STEM degrees, I don’t see the economics supporting expensive STEM programs when cheaper lib-arts programs are more in demand.  With this framing, the finger of blame for Big Ed’s vampire bloat is at least partially shared by students, parents, and corporate America, for it is these three who choose personal fulfillment over acquisition of skills that will put food on the table, who propagate the erroneous notion that college is the ticket to success, and who use college degrees and university-level certifications as stealth proxies for IQ and desirable personality qualities.

This book administers an economic “red pill” to the college-bound, so as to ensure they don’t end up like this woman, who racked up just under $100,000 in student loans for her interdisciplinary degree in religious and women’s studies and struggles to find gainful employment that will service her debt. Key quote: “I don’t want to spend the rest of my life slaving away to pay for an education I got for four years and would happily give back”.

A better poster boy, er, girl, for Mr. Clarey’s book, I don’t think I could find one better than Cortney Munna. For those in college, considering college, or are advising a young adult about to enter college, this book is a quick read and well worth your time.


About the author: EW is a well-trained monkey charged with operating heavier-than-air machinery. His interests outside of being an opinionated rabble-rouser are hunting, working out, motorcycling, spending time with his family, and flying. He is a father to three, a husband to one, and is a sometime contributor here at Spearhead. More of his intolerable drivel is available at the blog The Elusive Wapiti.

{ 87 comments… read them below or add one }

Rebel July 3, 2012 at 08:40

I don’t know if it’s me but I have always found that books writtn by women are made of lots and lots of verbiage but lack content.

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AfOR July 3, 2012 at 08:47

You can’t “even” be a low grade bricklayer without maths…

I want a wall single skin brick around my garden, 65 feet one side, 42 feet across the bottom, 88 feet back up the other side, with a 2×2 brick pier every 12 feet, and a height of 4 feet from the footings.

How many bricks (standard 8x4x2.25″) do you need, how many capping bricks, how much mortar, how long will it take at a brick laid every 20 seconds? So you can give me a fucking quote.

You wouldn’t BELIEVE how few people can do even BASIC fucking maths like that now, WITH a fucking calculator, much less without.

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dragnet July 3, 2012 at 08:55

Why is African-American in scare quotes?

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ConantheContrarian July 3, 2012 at 08:58

Let us go back in time 100 years. What did college students major in?Didn’t they have a good background in literature, arts, sciences, etc., in other words a well-rounded education? It wasn’t all STEM. Now, from the moment a student enters college, he must be on a track to get the education to find a job, not to achieve a well-rounded education. I would have loved to have been a classical scholar studying the ancient languages and civilizations of the world, but I realized that this demand for this kind of vocation was ever dwindling in a world that was being cut off from its past and was and is increasingly becoming barbaric.

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Art Vandelay July 3, 2012 at 09:09

I would have loved to have been a classical scholar studying the ancient languages and civilizations of the world, but I realized that this demand for this kind of vocation was ever dwindling in a world that was being cut off from its past and was and is increasingly becoming barbaric.

Well you don’t need an university to do that really nowadays, I suppose for pursuits like that all you need is Internet access, maybe a library and lots of time (in which you aren’t making money). And this goes for a lot of things, the only valuable thing they can give you is a degree, a piece of paper that states you are deemed competent in a certain field.

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Anon July 3, 2012 at 09:23

“…In an age of declining male enrollment and overwhelming female predilection for non-STEM degrees…”

Ah… I knew we’d find the problem in there somewhere.

Big Ed has been co-opted into providing enjoyable experiences for women (both during their school years and then afterward, in academia). The Big Three automakers, the Big Eight accounting firms and all the other Bigs have accepted what affirmative action requires, that women be provided with enjoyable experiences, none of which have to do with producing things that people will pay money for.

When will the money run out? Hasn’t anyone noticed that we can only provide women with enjoyable experiences (a species requirement, I think) on a sustainable basis when women are at home while men kill the sabertooths and mastodons, uh, perform practical tasks to make money?

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Paul Murray July 3, 2012 at 09:32

Ideally, computing and medicine should be taught by something like a trade school. And in practice, it is. An apprenticing systems would be a great idea for these fields. And *most* professional people actually aren’t learned, aren’t scholars (for instance: cult members tend to be from the professional class).

Universities should split into “Academic” and “Vocational” streams. Societies need eggheads with degrees in “Letters”, and that’s cool. Someone needs to be able to take the long view, and the state should finance it, because it’s a long-term good.

It’s time we admitted that coding is a trade, and put Universities back to the job of passing down the knowledge, and attempting to educate the moneyed elites. Or at least teaching them a little history. A few semesters of “the economic history of the west” drummed into the heads of today’s oligarchy might have prevented some of the worst of the current crises.

Oh: and get rid of college sports. Goddamn jocks littering the campus. Screw those guys.

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Pirran July 3, 2012 at 09:37

I’ve been a fan of Captain Capitalism’s blog for a while (I admit, I haven’t read the book yet), but one thing strikes me as increasingly relevant: how many women are now factoring their debt into the dating equation?

The majority of these worthless majors (and the ensuing debt) are going to be held by women and they’re going to try to hide the reality of that as ruthlessly as the true father of the child they want you to believe is your own.

You don’t want to be cuckolded by a hidden 100k of debt any more than a kid who increasingly resembles the pool guy. Smart fathers use paternity testing (however discreetly); smart, solvent men should get access to her real finances ASAP in any potential LTR.

There’s going to be more and more of this as the economy tanks.

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Donkey July 3, 2012 at 09:45

‘A few semesters of “the economic history of the west” drummed into the heads of today’s oligarchy might have prevented some of the worst of the current crises. ‘ – Paul Murray

Economic history is rewritten every generation to give the ruling elite, those in charge of forming and shaping the people who become PhDs more power.

Look at these economic dunces like Krugman educating our young. The lessons they do learn are the exact opposite of what happened in history. According to the head of the Federal Reserve, Bernanke, the reason for the great depression was not enough government seizure of assets and means of production, when what actually happened was the largest in history up to that point.

Read classical economics, not this neo-Keynesian nonsense pushed as to give the unaccountable rulers more control over your personal life.

First they came for the Big-Gulp colas.

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Emanon July 3, 2012 at 09:56

I used to post here as ‘Nemo’, but for some reason my posts are being blocked. I’ll try changing my nom de guerre and see if this gets through.

I have good news and bad news.

The good news is that online education may soon make it possible for many men to take courses over the Internet and rarely set foot on campus. I took (and passed) the first course offered by MITx (now called edX) and found it to be as good as many courses offered in college when I attended many years ago.

https://6002x.mitx.mit.edu/info

http://www.edxonline.org/

Next, the bad news. The US imports so many STEM subject recipients under H1B and other visas that the job market and wages are artificially depressed. This is a big reason why there are so few US citizens getting STEM degrees. Employers *prefer* to hire cheaper foreign labor.

They also have strict rules that require H1B holders to leave the country almost immediately if they lose their job, so an employer can essentially fire *and* deport you at the same time. This makes it hard for the visa holder to refuse to work unpaid overtime or bad hours or any request from their employer.

Most smart kids don’t want to compete with indentured servants in a”race to the bottom” of worsening working conditions.

Contrast this with the licensing of doctors and lawyers. The AMA and ABA have things rigged so that each individual *state* issues a license to practice medicine or law (by passing the ‘bar’ exam for lawyers). Not only are foreigners excluded, but even someone from another state must pass a long and deliberately complex series of tests to practice those professions out-of-state.

A doctor needs to spend years in residency to qualify to practice medicine in the USA but an engineer can fly in and drive straight to work from the airport. This is by design, not by accident. The few exceptions include some civil and nuclear engineers that need licenses (P.E. for civies) or security clearances (for nukes).

It is, IMHO, not a coincidence that the professions that women like have very high barriers for entry (law, medicine) and the professions that men prefer (STEM) not only have no barriers for entry, but have special custom-built automatic doors that are specifically designed to allow cheap foreigners to displace the native workers.

The USA is so screwed up by feminism that even our visa laws are designed to hurt men and help women.

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Huck Finn July 3, 2012 at 09:59

Interesting piece. I wasn’t familiar with the book’s author.

OT:
About a year ago, the Wiki definition of the Men’s Movement was written by a misandrist pushing feminist propaganda. I just revisited the topic on Wiki and it has been changed for the better. It is very different, not perfect though far more fair and balanced. A positive step forward.

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digital_dreamer July 3, 2012 at 10:13

@AfOR
~5000 bricks in 30 minutes?
I enjoy the math better. :-P

MAJ

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Keyster July 3, 2012 at 10:20

who propagate the erroneous notion that college is the ticket to success, and who use college degrees and university-level certifications as stealth proxies for IQ and desirable personality qualities.

Having a degree in something, anything, is a box the HR Rep will often check, because she herself has a worthless degree she seeks to validate. Employers have been so inundated with resumes they use key-word filters to look for “Degree” and other desirable traits; rarely does a human actually read your resume anymore. It makes it so much easier to sell a candidate to management if all the boxes are neatly ticked before bringing him in for an interview.

The reality is education, experience and competence are barely relevant in most jobs. Even a graduate in Electrical Engineering or Computer Science might use <10% of what he learned in college. (It changes so quickly, and colleges are usually several years behind in their curriculum.) It's very rare to see someone fired for blatant incompetence. They have to be pretty bad.

What's most typical is someone who seems to go against the grain of the corporate culture, thinks "outside the box", has imagination and is willing to take risks. These are the ones that make others on "the team" feel uncomfortable. Their ideas, work ethic, passion and penchant for getting things done antagonizes others. Soon a passive-aggressive campaign will be launched against this worker among his peers to slowly demoralize and frustrate him, driving him out. The only workers left are unenthused, less theatening drones; the friendly "nice" people that everyone likes. The company soon whithers to a shell of itself or dies.

All that really matters is one's ability to navigate the corporate culture and political landscape (play "Survivor"). ALWAYS be selling yourself and kissing EVERYONE'S ass, especially the people that don't like you; (and there will plenty of them). The actual Work itself is rather secondary. Likeability is key. People who ride the company into the ground are masters at the Likeability Game. Even the people with the Bankruptcy Court seem to like them.

Learn "People Skills", be a "Team Player", NEVER lose your cool or
complain, don't make waves, stay underneath management's radar. Look good, say only positive things about everything and everybody. Work hard and do a good job at your own risk. Always act busy. Always manage the perception others might have of you. Avoid the negative people no one else likes or you'll be associated as being like them.

And above all else THINK correctly, because regardless of how well you act, management knows what you're thinking.

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Great Books For Men GreatBooksForMen GBFM (TM) GB4M (TM) GR8BOOKS4MEN (TM) lzozozozozlzo (TM) July 3, 2012 at 10:34

Albert Einstein: Somebody who reads only newspapers and at best books of contemporary authors looks to me like an extremely near-sighted person who scorns eyeglasses. He is completely dependent on the prejudices and fashions of his times, since he never gets to see or hear anything else. And what a person thinks on his own without being stimulated by the thoughts and experiences of other people is even in the best case rather paltry and monotonous. There are only a few enlightened people with a lucid mind and style and with good taste within a century. What has been preserved of their work belongs among the most precious possessions of mankind. We owe it to a few writers of antiquity that the people of the Middle Ages could slowly extricate themselves from the superstitions and ignorance that had darkened life for more than half a milleniun. –Ideas and Opinions

Dr. Carl J. Richards (in The Founders and The Classics, Greece, Rome, and the American Enlightenment): Through the use of Roman analogies, William Fairfax, Washington’s mentor and surrogate father, impressed upon him “that the greatest of all achievements was, through honorable deeds, to win the applause of one’s countrymen.” . . It was customary for guests at Belvoir, the Fairfax estate, to sign their names in a register, followed by a favorite Latin quotation. . . Although the founders always endorsed classical education on utilitarian grounds, they defined “utility” in the broadest possible manner. In addition to the writing models, knowledge, and ideas which the classics furnished, the founders contended that they were an indispensible training in virtue. John Adams lectured John Quincy: “I wish to hear of your beginning Sallust, who is one of the most polished and perfect of the Roman Historians, every Period of whom, and I had almost said every Syllable and every Letter, is worth Studying. In company with Sallust, Cicero, Tacitus, and Livy, you will learn Wisdom and Virtue. You will see them represented with all the Charms which Language and Imagination can exhibit, and Vice and Folly painted in all their Deformity and Horror. You will ever remember that all the End of study is to make you a good Man and a useful Citizen. . . The connection between the classics and virtue was deeply engrained and implicitly understood. In 1778 Adams wrote regarding Arthur Lee’s sons (including Richard Henry Lee): “Their father had given them all excellent classical educations, and they were all virtuous men.” To Adams, the causal relationship between the first fact and the second was too obvious to require explanation. Such a relationship could be assumed, since the stated purpose of most classical literature, including works of history, had always been to inculcate morality. Since the inculcation of a fixed moral code is not the expressed purpose of most modern literature (perhaps because there is no longer a consenus concerning morality), modern people would be perplexed by the statement, “They all study American history, and they are all virtous people.” But to the founders, the connection between classical training and virtue was clear.” –C. J. Richard, The Founders and the Classics, Greece, Rome, and the American Enlightenment, p. 37

C.J. Richard: College entrance requirements, which remained remarkably stable for almost two hundred years, mandated a basic knowledge of the classical languages. When John Winthrop’s nephew, George Downing, applied to Harvard in the mid-seventeenth century, he wa required to “understand Tully [Cicero], Viirgil, or any such classical authors, and readily to speak or write true Latin in prose and have skill in making Latin verse and be completely grounded in the Greek language.” When John Adams entered Harvard a century later, in the 1750s, Harvard demanded that he be able “extempore to read, construe, and parse Tully, Virgil, or such like common classical authors, and to write Latin in prose, and to be skilled in making Latin verse, or at least in the rules of the Prosodia, and to read, construe, and parse ordinary Greek, as in the New Testament, Isocrates, or such like, and decline the paradigms of Greek nouns and verbs.” In 1760, when John Jay entered King’ College (now Columbia), he was obliged to give a rational account of the Greek and Latin grammars, read three orations of Cicero and three books of Vrigil’s Aeneid, and translate the fist ten chapters of John into Latin. In 1774, when Alexander Hamilton chose King’s College over the College of New Jersey because Witherspoon refused to allow the impatient West Indain to move through his program at an accelerated pace, the Princteon entrance examination required “the ability to write Latin prose, translate Virgil, Cicero, and the Greek gospels, and a commensurate knowledge of Latin and Greek grammar.” Finally, in 1816, when Hoarace Mann applied for entrance to Brown University, he faced requirements which Downing would have been completely comfortable: the ability “To read accurately, construe, and parse Tully and the Greek Testament and Virgil . . .to write Latin in prose, and [to know] the rules of Prosody.” Colleges were interested in a candidate’s ability to read Latin and Greek and little else. –C.J. Richard, The Founders and the Classics, Greece, Rome, and the American Enlightenment, p. 19 (Today colleges are interested in a candidate’s ability to take on massive debt which can never be escaped from, not even by declaring bankruptcy, and little else, other than said candidate’s ability to quietly surrender to the deconstruction and debauchery of the culture and currency while going lzozzozzozlzlo.)

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Keyster July 3, 2012 at 10:36

Next, the bad news. The US imports so many STEM subject recipients under H1B and other visas that the job market and wages are artificially depressed.

That’s good point the author might have missed.
Silicon Valley has become predominately Indian and/or Asian. Not to mention many of the engineering teams are off-shore, working remotely. $120K a year in San Jose vs. $18K a year in New Delhi, (and the Indian guy is a far better engineer!). They keep some token white guys around for appearances; women still rule accounting and marketing and HR and “administrative services”.

I wouldn’t get a degree in anything right now. I’d learn everything I can online/in books on some speciality, and land an entry level position at a big company and work my way up. That’s what I did 30 years ago.

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J July 3, 2012 at 10:37

Honestly, I saw this coming when I started going to college in the mid to late 90′s. Everyone I said it to gave me a deer-in-the-headlights type of look followed by “how dare you say such foolishness” look. I stopped wasting my time in college because I had no clue what I wanted until now, and now I am back in a hard core STEM degree plan.

I was in the military for ten years, now almost eevery business I talk to says they would hire me as at least an assistant manager if not let me just run the place. They just can’t afford my foreman’s salary/skills! Hard to say really, with all the internet based businesses out there, why anyone would think so “brick and mortar?” Everything is getting smaller and smaller. This is a great thing! For all the hype feminists have purposed these last several decades, they are on the cusp of their own “fulfillment”

Let them have it! They richly deserve it! Get your degree of some form of valuable production field, and help us screw over China, feminists, and every other communist thinker, get our wives of the future from their crazed brainwashing routines and let’s all get back to normal.

If they still wanna fight, then they can prove that women are just as good. We have thousands of years of “proof” of what men are capable of. They are selling us snake oil. If they want to prove something let them. But DO NOT “bail them out.” Women are not too big to fail, yet. They eat too much fast food here, so you never know? LOL

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Morrisfactor July 3, 2012 at 10:47

“For how does a sociology major (or journo, psych, poli sci, music, hyphenated-American, English major…you get my point) contribute to the design and production of a cell phone, the extraction of petroleum to fuel a sports car, or make or provide much anything of value that consumers demand?”

Well, since Clinton signed NAFTA and Congress has followed up with similar acts, we have kissed our manufacturing base goodbye. Without manufacturing, there is little need for many of those STEM degrees too.

For nearly two decades I’ve owned a small manufacturing company. I buy raw goods from seven countries to assemble our product in the USA.

Right now, China is importing the same FINISHED products (landed in the US with duty and freight paid) for less than I can even purchase the raw goods. The engineering and design work is all done by the overseas countries who roll the R&D costs right into the finished price for free.

So even if a college grad owns a STEM degree, I’m thinking there are few companies left in the US who are going to hire them.

Allowing our manufacturing base to vanish was unimaginably stupid of our politicians, but I’m sure they could have cared less, they got their pockets filled.

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Firepower July 3, 2012 at 10:51

This book is TWO decades late. Anybody with the brains to go to college should have the brains to see college is now useless – unless it’s a social work degree for ever expanding government jobs (and only if you’re a woman or mino).

Or, a STEM degree. And let’s be honest: few can hack the courses. So, that means few will prosper – all the rest are scrap. What NO one wants to face is being scrap in a New America with no more jobs for anybody – especially scrap.

It’s just whistling past the graveyard. America 2042 is going to be a rough place for those 40-year-olds who now bask in their Golden 20′s.

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Thomas Tell-Truth July 3, 2012 at 11:07

“I wouldn’t get a degree in anything right now. I’d learn everything I can online/in books on some speciality, and land an entry level position at a big company and work my way up. That’s what I did 30 years ago.”

Doesn’t work. Society now is more credentialist. That’s an inevitable side effect of maternalism. The little piece of paper that tells everyone you have been properly processed at an approved education factory is more important that actual skill and knowledge.

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Peter South July 3, 2012 at 11:08

I’d learn everything I can online/in books on some speciality, and land an entry level position at a big company and work my way up.

You’d be lucky if anyone would let you work for free. No one could defend that hiring decision to their manager if anything went wrong.

The problems with Indians and Asians is while cheaper they are not necessarily better and can’t speak good Engrish. An Indian PHD is like an American bachelors, it comes with endless knowledge and limited problem solving skills.

Hence, many jobs remain with whitey for the time being.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 0
Geography Bee Finalist himself July 3, 2012 at 11:09

I’m surprised that foreign languages were not included as an almost-entirely-worthless major, given that they are almost never taught so that a graduate can do any particular occupation or set of occupations (pest extermination, mining, real estate, firefighting, mechanics or any other gainful occupation) in a particular foreign language.

I never encountered anyone in francophone Mali who gave even half a shit whether or not I had read any francophone literature from any francophone country anywhere in the world, even theirs or another country in West or Central Africa. (I had wanted to go to Africa ever since I was very young. I also am a hardcore philistine when it comes to fiction.)

The way Spanish was taught at the college I attended, one professor did not even name the lone African country where it is the official language, Equatorial Guinea, nor was Equatorial Guinea even remotely covered in Spanish classes.

(Siena College was still sending faculty and students down to Fort Benning, GA, to whine, I mean, protest about the continued operation of the School for the Americas in 2003, long after the death squads had stopped operating in Latin America, but the Spanish faculty does not want to touch Spanish-speaking Equatorial Guinea on a map. Sounds like screwed up priorities.)

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 2
Troll King July 3, 2012 at 11:29

OT

How do you define Equality:

http://www.feministe.us/blog/archives/2012/07/03/how-do-you-define-equality/

This is sure to be interesting and good for a laugh. One commenter already wants to do away with private property cause it is privileged…lolz

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 1
AfOR July 3, 2012 at 11:35

@ digital dreamer

a standard english brick is 8 x 4 x 2.25″, add a standard quarter inch of mortar and that means the area of the side of one laid brick is 8.25 x 2.5 = 20.625 square inches.

There are 144 square inches in a square foot, so 144 / 20.625 = 6.981 laid bricks per square foot, or in brickie rule of thumb terms 7 laid bricks a square foot.

The wall was 65 + 42 + 88 = 195 feet long, plus a pillar every 12 feet so call it another 12 equivalent wall feet for a total of 207 feet long

4 foot high over the footings = 4 x 207 = 828 square feet

828 x 7 = 5,796 bricks, at a brick every 20 seconds that’s 32 hours

If you lay “frog down” there is (8 + 2.25) x 4 x 0.25 = 10.25 cubic inches of mortar per brick, or 1,728 / 10.25 = 168 bricks worth of mortar in one cubic foot of mortar, s0 5,796 / 168 = 34 cubic feet of mortar to do the job.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 0
Opus July 3, 2012 at 11:41

At the Bank

Opus (to overweight young woman) : I see from your card that you have a Bachelor’s Degree from [Red Brick University] in Science. What persauded you to work as a Bank Teller?

Female Teller: It’s Sociology. At [Red Brick] that is Regarded as Science.

Opus (being very condescending and charming): And so indeed it is.

Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 18 Thumb down 3
Keyster July 3, 2012 at 11:46

I’d learn everything I can online/in books on some speciality, and land an entry level position at a big company and work my way up.

You’d be lucky if anyone would let you work for free. No one could defend that hiring decision to their manager if anything went wrong.

Getting your foot in the door is the key; take whatever job there is and do it the best you can while enhancing you’re knowledge on the side. You’ve got the inside track on openings and you have access to the hiring manager in person. Befriend the deciding authorities, ask them for a chance.

It takes some rote luck, but so does scoring a job straight out of college. Some of the best employees in many corporations came from the loading dock or the assembly line. The most important part is LOOKING LIKE the job you want; how you present yourself.

Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 19 Thumb down 1
Robert July 3, 2012 at 11:50

Thomas Tell-Truth July 3, 2012 at 11:07
“I wouldn’t get a degree in anything right now. I’d learn everything I can online/in books on some speciality, and land an entry level position at a big company and work my way up. That’s what I did 30 years ago.”

Doesn’t work. Society now is more credentialist. That’s an inevitable side effect of maternalism. The little piece of paper that tells everyone you have been properly processed at an approved education factory is more important that actual skill and knowledge.

Like or Dislike: 2 0

. Peter South July 3, 2012 at 11:08
I’d learn everything I can online/in books on some speciality, and land an entry level position at a big company and work my way up.

You’d be lucky if anyone would let you work for free. No one could defend that hiring decision to their manager if anything went wrong.

The problems with Indians and Asians is while cheaper they are not necessarily better and can’t speak good Engrish. An Indian PHD is like an American bachelors, it comes with endless knowledge and limited problem solving skills.

Hence, many jobs remain with whitey for the time being.

You have heard of affrirmative action and the women first initiative right? Whitey? Who is whitey?

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 2
Robert July 3, 2012 at 11:55

Peter?

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2
van Rooinek July 3, 2012 at 12:03

Great Books For Men GreatBooksForMen GBFM (TM) GB4M (TM) GR8BOOKS4MEN (TM) lzozozozozlzo (TM)….

Dude…I like a lot of what you post, but you SERIOUSLY need a shorter screenname!

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 1
Mr. J July 3, 2012 at 12:10

Morrisfactor has spelled the hard facts out clearly….Over the past 40 years, politicians have sold us COMPLETELY down the river and soon there will be NO opportunity in the United States for anyone with self-respect and true, honest ambition to succeed.
The only thing left to do is get ready to fight.

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PeterTheGreat July 3, 2012 at 12:13

Even with a real degree, the victim women will still try to take it all. Time to cut and run –

Deadbeat dad flees to Philippines leaving four kids without support
http://www.thestar.com/news/gta/article/1220096–deadbeat-dad-flees-to-philippines-leaving-four-kids-without-support

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Mr. J July 3, 2012 at 12:21

Republicans don’t want the working man to profit from his labors and Democrats do, so they can criminally confiscate it.
We’re DONE.

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Charles Martel July 3, 2012 at 12:21

It takes some rote luck, but so does scoring a job straight out of college. Some of the best employees in many corporations came from the loading dock or the assembly line. The most important part is LOOKING LIKE the job you want; how you present yourself.

Yes. When I’d had enough of my last corporate job where I reported to the CEO, who was a USDA Grade A turkey, I started commuting to work in a pickup truck. You would not believe the negative effect that had as I pulled my Dodge Ram into the executive lot next to all the Cadillac Sevilles.

People are pathetic. Many of those pathetic people are men.

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Charles Martel July 3, 2012 at 12:34

The most disturbing employment trend, hands-down, is that the “best” jobs are now in government! Employment stability, early retirement and a solid pension. Risk-taking and innovation NOT required.

It used to be understood that government jobs were poorly-paid sinecures for the less ambitious and less able. Now they’re highly desirable, (relatively) highly-paid sinecures for whoever has the PC clout to get them.

Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 27 Thumb down 3
Peter South July 3, 2012 at 13:33

You have heard of affrirmative action and the women first initiative right? Whitey? Who is whitey?

Women are great when you need steps followed, consensus reached or you need to sweet talk some imbeciles but if you need technical solutions and someone to implement them in reality you need a man and that is one thing they can’t legislate.

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Huck Finn July 3, 2012 at 13:59

‘Deadbeat dad flees to Philippines leaving four kids without support’

PeterTheGreat, thanks it was an interesting story.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0
Georice81 July 3, 2012 at 14:03

I have read that 100 years ago the typical curriculum at many universities would’ve been considered as liberal arts today for sure. Yet what they covered was vastly different. They emphasized the classics (including the Bible), Government, Philosophy and Logic, English, a foreign language, a dead language (Ancient Greek, Latin, Hebrew), Natural Science (Chemistry, Biology) History and Mathematics. The difference is that the students back then did learn the material very very well. They were very rounded individuals who could reason very well, communicate excellently, perform math equations, talk about any topic, and communicate with similar people worldwide. This made them very flexible and they could easily assimilate law, science or engineering at whatever apprentice level they ended at. These were definitely not boring people.

Most importantly these students were taught and embraced Western Mores and Virtues. This is why liberals sought to and successfully dismantled this type of education and substituted the modern progressive schooling.

I work with a bunch of engineers who are quite smart but can’t speak about anything else but their jobs. As intelligent as most of them are, I am appalled at how little understanding or interest they have of politics and history.

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Charles Martel July 3, 2012 at 14:06

Pirran
You don’t want to be cuckolded by a hidden 100k of debt any more than a kid who increasingly resembles the pool guy. Smart fathers use paternity testing (however discreetly); smart, solvent men should get access to her real finances ASAP in any potential LTR.

If and when my son decides to get married, I intend to pay for a full background check on his beloved.

Well-loved. Like or Dislike: Thumb up 24 Thumb down 1
Gamerp4 July 3, 2012 at 14:31

This book is not for me as i am already a traveller, I have been to middle east and to other western countries many times, and yes this book is quite amazing for young guys, i would want them to read it because surely Young guys may not want a wife in their life but they do want a career which will open ways for them to travel to their dreams & fantasies (When i refer to fantasy donot think of unicorns or fairies, because my reference of this word means to know the global world around us, adventure is what men’s fantasy is mostly), and that will surely give you a good prespective of what your future step should be.

So holla from me brothers. On and Out.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 2
Peter South July 3, 2012 at 14:32

It takes some rote luck, but so does scoring a job straight out of college. Some of the best employees in many corporations came from the loading dock or the assembly line. The most important part is LOOKING LIKE the job you want; how you present yourself.

You’ll need more than luck, try a time machine.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 0
Uncle Elmer July 3, 2012 at 14:58

Good stuff from Cap’n Capitalism.

My son Hermann is starting college this fall. He is balking at a full-blown engineering program and we have talked about this a bit.

As I work at home mostly he sees what I do (no, not Spearhead commenting, there’s no job market for that) and I tole him he could do it, and the colleges won’t teach it but will give him the foundation to build on.

Basically it’s this : learn to market and sell technical products and services. He has good storytelling and graphics skills, so he needs to learn 3D modeling and how to put together technical proposals. I suggested a minor in Engineering Physics and a business major.

The business major is just fluff so he can chase women and enjoy himself, which I am strongly advising him to do. He should have no intention of working at Encorpera.

As others mentioned no one will take him seriously until he’s 30 or so. But he can pay some dues and learn some chops, perhaps end up in the top of some startup food chain. One only needs to bring in some funding.

Also online classes are definitely changing the landscape. I took some online grad classes a few years ago and am working in that industry now. Credentials are essential but you shouldn’t mortgage your future to get them. Plenty of options for you these days. One path is to get some coursework, get in the industry, and get your employer to pay for additional classes towards a degree. So what if you are 35 when you finish?

The military also has some good educational benefits while you are in and when you get out. Just don’t tell them you wanna be “airborne” and you’ll probably do ok.

As for the women, I advised Hermann to tell American females he has an arranged marriage with a hot young viet girl. My wife’s niece is 10 right now and will be perfect for him when he’s ready. Her mom is shit-hot and she will be too.

I also tole him to be more Jewish for the business opportunities. To observe that a Jew in a low-level sales job approaches it with enthusiasm and the potential to build an industry, whereas a gentile will treat it like it’s just a crappy job. Also he would have to get circumcised, but he said “no way”.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 14 Thumb down 3
AfOR July 3, 2012 at 15:07

on topic

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/guest-post-dear-person-seeking-job-why-i-cant-hire-you

Potential employers have to respond to the incentives and disincentives that exist in today’s world, and those do not favor conventional permanent employees. We know you’re hard-working, motivated, tech-savvy and willing to learn. The reason we can’t hire you has nothing to do with your work ethic or skills; it’s the high-cost of the Status Quo, and the many perverse consequences of maintaining a failing Status Quo. The sad truth is that it’s costly and risky to hire anyone to do anything, and “bankable projects” that might generate profit/require more labor are few and far between. The economy is different now, and wishing it were unchanged from 30 years ago won’t reverse the clock. We have to respond to the incentives and disincentives that exist in today’s world, and those do not favor conventional permanent employees except in sectors that are largely walled off from the market economy: government, healthcare, etc. But these moated sectors cannot remain isolated from the deflationary market economy forever.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 14 Thumb down 0
Elusive Wapiti July 3, 2012 at 15:14

“Why is African-American in scare quotes?”

Because it is a ridiculous neo-logism whose primary, even sole, purpose is to support race-based set-asides and Marxist class warfare.

Why not just use ‘black’ as a perfectly decriptive descriptor? After all, we use “white” instead of the polysyllabic “European-American”.

Moreover, aren’t whites who emigrated to the United States from from Africa as “African American” or more than those whose ancestors came here 250 years ago?

BTW the quotes are mine, not Cappy’s.

Pirran July 3, 2012 at 15:32

@Elusive Wapiti
“Moreover, aren’t whites who emigrated to the United States from from Africa as “African American” or more than those whose ancestors came here 250 years ago?”

As we all came out of Africa (c. 70 – 100 thousand years ago), you could explode the mind of a hipster pedant by pointing out that we’re ALL hyphenated Africans (and that you deeply resent him/her not acknowledging your ethnic status).

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 13 Thumb down 2
Eric July 3, 2012 at 15:48

Martel:
That cracked me up about driving your Dodge Ram to the Corporate Board meeting. LOL, those ‘suits’ tremble at any sign of masculine statement, don’t they?

A former client of mine was a top manager for a restaurant chain once. He drove to corporate meetings in a Pontiac GTO that he restored himself! After he got criticised about his ‘image’ he dumped those schlox and started his own restaurant.

Self-employment is the way to go; although I’ve read recently that ‘experts’ on online dating sites are warning the Amerobitches to avoid ‘self-employed’ men!

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 15 Thumb down 2
Eric July 3, 2012 at 15:54

Uncle Elmer:
‘The business major is just fluff so he can chase women and enjoy himself’

Just make sure you advise him to chase foreign exchange students—or the ‘enjoying himself’ part will be negated.

‘…balking at the full-blown engineering program.’

If he’s good at math and sciences, have him take plenty of those courses along with his ‘business’ major. Then, when he’s a sophomore or junior try to talk him into transferring to an engineering school like Cal Tech.

Normally, I would advise going overseas for university-level stuff, but unfortunately, foreign degrees in things like engineering and medicine don’t carry any weight in the US.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 3
Eric July 3, 2012 at 16:00

Opus:
If you really want a laugh (or cry) check out the circulum offered by this American ‘institution of higher learning.’

http://www.evergreen.edu/catalog/2012-13/index

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1
Just Sayin' July 3, 2012 at 16:01

Perhaps in evaluating the book of this purported “expert”, it would be useful to check out his website, which makes it clear that he’s a lazy do-nothing, who wants to make his own indolence and lack of accomplishment seem less pathetic by denigrating those who do succeed. And for somebody who has the audacity to talk about the “worthlessness” of other people’s degrees, it’s amusing to note that he can’t even punctuate properly.

Now, it may well be that some of the derided disciplines are “worthless”, but anybody who expects that a traditional liberal arts degree is supposed to give you direct access to a specific career obviously has no idea what the purpose of such a degree is. It’s not like going to pharmacy school, you know.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 12
W.F. Price July 3, 2012 at 16:13

As we all came out of Africa (c. 70 – 100 thousand years ago), you could explode the mind of a hipster pedant by pointing out that we’re ALL hyphenated Africans (and that you deeply resent him/her not acknowledging your ethnic status).

-Pirran

I’m a bit skeptical of the recent Out of Africa Theory. I think there was gene flow in both directions (into and out of Africa) going on for a very, very long time. Actually, even in recent human evolution there are some odd results, such as the high concentration of R1b in Cameroon, which appears to suggest ancient gene flow from Western Europe to West Africa.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 11 Thumb down 3
Rebel July 3, 2012 at 16:14

@Uncle Elmer
“As for the women, I advised Hermann to tell American females he has an arranged marriage with a hot young viet girl. ”

Vietnamese women are hardly ever mentioned when it comes to foreign wives. I think this is a mistake. Vietnamese women are alwys smiling. They make very good wives.
Hermann will be a happy man I’m sure.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 14 Thumb down 1
Gilgamesh July 3, 2012 at 16:55

Wait, Business is a fluff major? Shit.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1
Born Free July 3, 2012 at 16:57

I’d really like to know what sort of degree Captain Capitalist has. He calls himself a frustrated economist. If his degree is in economics, I consider that a useless liberal arts degree.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 2
Uncle Elmer July 3, 2012 at 17:39

“Wait, Business is a fluff major? Shit.”

——————–

Well, no. Should not have said that. Though I think many business curriculums prepare one for an entry level position at Encorpera, in itself not a bad thing, but not what I am advising him to pursue. An entrepreneurial program would be useful. Problem is most college profs have no entrepreneurial experience. Difficult to teach this sort of skill.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0
Peter South July 3, 2012 at 19:10

As we all came out of Africa (c. 70 – 100 thousand years ago), you could explode the mind of a hipster pedant by pointing out that we’re ALL hyphenated Africans (and that you deeply resent him/her not acknowledging your ethnic status).

That’s a good point.

Now about my 8a set asides…

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0
Jason July 3, 2012 at 19:22

Does CC touch on the entitlement mentality that so many Gen-Y kids have these days? That it is something that will make them difficult to employ and even if they can find a job, make them unpopular and unpleasant in the work place? We have one at my place, nice enough guy I suppose but OMG you just want to punch him in the face at times with his whole “Well I know best and I’m smarter than all of you” attitude. He is the poster boy for everything that is wrong with Gen-Y in the work place.

But I guess what should we expect from a generation raised on Participation Trophy’s and “self-esteem”.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 1
Gilgamesh July 3, 2012 at 20:34

@elmer Yeah, I guess a tenured/emeritus position gives you the completely wrong mentality for teaching competition. Would love to know how one goes about doing market research and finding venture capitalists though.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0
evilwhitemalempire July 3, 2012 at 22:58

-and who use college degrees and university-level certifications as stealth proxies for IQ and desirable personality qualities.

——————-
http://manboobz.com/

need i say more?

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0
Brigadon July 3, 2012 at 23:02

I think people are missing the obvious corollary.

The world has changed, so it’s time to change with it! why not become and ‘unlicensed private entrepreneur’?

The market is wide open for career crimin…entrepreneurs. Virtually everything you need to know you can learn online (see anarchist cookbook, locksmithing programs, self-assertiveness courses, electronic security, electrical engineering, sleight of hand, martial arts, you can even find cheap shooting classes involving a case of beer and box of bullets.) and there is rapid growth and turnover for motivated, clever, and intelligent individuals. Turnover alone is virtually guaranteed to help you reach your full potential in no time.

Forget the crap you see on TV. solve rates for murder alone are less than one in five, and those quick pickups are generally the result of the entrepreneur doing something monumentally stupid, such as sticking his passport to the wall with his wife’s blood. Robbery, larceny, extortion, and many other rackets are nearly impossible to catch as long as you are not too stupid to take some elementary precautions and you don’t get too greedy.

The benefits are profound. You never have to deal with hiring quotas or affirmative action, or even women in the workplace if you do not wish to. Sexual harassment is generally welcomed by female employees(at least compared to a bullet in the brainpan) you do not have to watch your verbal step constantly (although you may have to watch your back instead) The hours are magnificent (since you set them yourself) and in the end, all you need is one really good contract to retire and live the rest of your life in comfort and luxury someplace with warm sand and no extradition.

There are a number of careers available. breaking-and-entry specialists, kidnappers, assassins, heck you could even get many jobs from our federal government itself, it’s looking for talented assassins.

Feminism destroyed chivalry, corrupted honor, laughs at morality and ethics. Isn’t it about time the modern, intelligent man takes advantage of this shift in dynamics to choose a new, rewarding career in illegal industries where his intelligence and sheer skill will always help him pull out ahead?
Very little education required, but the more you can find, the longer you will live.

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evilwhitemalempire July 3, 2012 at 23:09

And besides, how well do colleges do these days matriculating cultured, critically thinking, well-rounded citizens anyways?
—————–
about that term ‘critical thinking’

i used to think it meant thinking hard about stuff

it is now clear to me that it’s most likely a term derived from the cultural marxist term ‘critical theory’ in which case it has nothing to do with thinking hard about anything

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Eric July 3, 2012 at 23:21

EvilWhiteMaleEmpire:
‘Critical thinking’ goes back to a pre-PC period when rhetoric and logic were required courses. It was about learning how to analyse arguments.

That, of course, is against the Marxist bent of the new academia: so they’ve renamed Marxist Critical Theory as ‘critical thinking’ to make it more acceptable. They’ve hijacked a lot of other terminology in the same ways.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 1
Art Vandelay July 4, 2012 at 00:41

‘Critical thinking’ goes back to a pre-PC period when rhetoric and logic were required courses. It was about learning how to analyse arguments.

I think feminists have a disdain for the scientific method and are going back to the times when people believed in absolute truths instead of trusting assumptions until they are disproved or a better theory arises. Opinion and observable fact become intermingled, feelings are more important than provable fact and if the data doesn’t fit just make something up – for example: How would you with any degree of accuracy find out the number of unreported rapes? It’s not possible. Of course this makes most of them unsuitable for fields which rely on observable fact (classic science, physics, maths and so on). Even if you feel that the theory of relativity is oppressive it doesn’t make it any less valid.

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Anonymous July 4, 2012 at 04:20

Pirran

You don’t want to be cuckolded by a hidden 100k of debt any more than a kid who increasingly resembles the pool guy. Smart fathers use paternity testing (however discreetly); smart, solvent men should get access to her real finances ASAP in any potential LTR.

There are people in this world who occupy the bodies of adults but their brain has not emotionally advanced beyond adolescence. They value instant gratification over long term stability. They make decisions based on what will make them feel good this month, even at the detriment of next year, plus interest. What a woman with $100k of college debt tells me is she’s Trouble with a capital T. Even if she was the most beautiful women who ever walked on this Earth I’d run, not walk, away from such a woman.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 0
ode July 4, 2012 at 04:21

Pirran

You don’t want to be cuckolded by a hidden 100k of debt any more than a kid who increasingly resembles the pool guy. Smart fathers use paternity testing (however discreetly); smart, solvent men should get access to her real finances ASAP in any potential LTR.

There are people in this world who occupy the bodies of adults but their brain has not emotionally advanced beyond adolescence. They value instant gratification over long term stability. They make decisions based on what will make them feel good this month, even at the detriment of next year, plus interest. What a woman with $100k of college debt tells me is she’s Trouble with a capital T. Even if she was the most beautiful women who ever walked on this Earth I’d run, not walk, away from such a woman.

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0
ode July 4, 2012 at 06:46

Allowing our manufacturing base to vanish was unimaginably stupid of our politicians, but I’m sure they could have cared less, they got their pockets filled.

Politicians belong to the elite class and what elites have in common is they are “globalist”. What this means is an
American elite is no more American then a
Russian elite is Russian or a
Chinese elite is Chinese.
Their nationality means nothing to them personally because they have no loyalty to their nation. If one factory in America gets closed while another in China gets opened, then hey that’s called an equal exchange according to an elite. Since they can run a business anywhere in the world they don’t care.

Obama is a very good example of an elite who sees himself as a “global” citizen. If having loyalty to one’s nation was a job requirement to become a politician then they’d be a lot of politicians who would loss their jobs.

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Migu July 4, 2012 at 07:49

The degree is not worthless, it’s just not worth the cost through conventional methods. It is overpriced. The credential is not worth what you pay for it.

Unless you do this way…

http://www.garynorth.com/public/department89.cfm

And if you’re paying for kids…..

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 1
Jerry July 4, 2012 at 08:12

I also read this book and I highly recommend it, especially for those entering college or already in college.

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Keyster July 4, 2012 at 09:02

Martel:
That cracked me up about driving your Dodge Ram to the Corporate Board meeting. LOL, those ‘suits’ tremble at any sign of masculine statement, don’t they?

It’s important that you project what the other executives are doing. If they all play golf, you should too. I worked at one company where you HAD to own a BMW to be IN. There was another company where the boss would go outside to smoke every hour, if you were a smoker too you joined him and you were IN; you’d get all the scuttle-butt and inside info on the politics outside by the dock doors.

And then the all important “Cute Wives Club”. Man-o-man, if you had a cute wife the level of respect other men had for you was invaluable. Bonus points for having two cute children. Having an ugly wife is not helpful (his he actually f*cking that?), but at least everyone will know you’re not gay. If you’re single you need to have a cute girlfriend on your arm at company events. If you go Stag, you’re not “executive material”, you’re a loser that can’t attract a woman or gay. Not showing up at all is just as bad.

Typically at say Christmas parties, they’ll carefully structure the tables around your standing in the corporation. Cool/IN guys with cute wives will sit with some of the executives and their cute wives. Uncool guys with ugly wives will sit together, like engineers and accountants. But if you’re among the lowly Singles, you’ll get your own table towards the back, in the corner. Everyone will try to make light conversation while, the awkwardness of it all is palpable. Social caste systems don’t end with High School. They’re just more nuanced.

Dress well, have an exceptable car, stay fit, (fatties are OUT) and by all means BE MARRIED, preferrably to a Cute Wife. Find out what the “cool crowd” is in to and do it. Have good hair and strong jaw line, speak with gravitas.

One boss I had held a Saturday morning basketball game – – all the Cool Guys were invited to play. If you didn’t seem athletic, you didn’t even know about it taking place. This informal “bonding time” was CRUCIAL to getting ahead. Working hard and doing a great job were not even considered if you weren’t IN.

Yes there are Boys Clubs, a glass ceiling, but they exclude beta males as much as women. Be cool or be cast out. IMAGE is EVERYTHING!

Like or Dislike: Thumb up 15 Thumb down 1
Brigadon July 4, 2012 at 09:17

I see a rush quote here :P

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Natália July 4, 2012 at 09:31

The advice in the article reminds me a conversation I had with my dad eight or ten years ago, when I was deciding what I would study in college. I was seriously considering history of art. All my dad said was: “nonsense, that won’t pay your bills. Study economics, like me, and specialize in something useful”. Luckily I took his advice, and I had more than one job offer even before I graduated :)

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Gilgamesh July 4, 2012 at 10:47

@keyster Those guys don’t sound alpha at all, they sound like beta ass kissers who happen to be higher than the other beta ass kissers. I can’t see you staying in a job like that so what was your solution?

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Opus July 4, 2012 at 11:00

I think that one needs to be very cautious about rubbishing Liberal Arts degrees, as if STEM subjects are the key to wealth, or worse, that people should only pursue STEM subjects for reason of financial gain. Natalia above refers to having been put-off studying History of Art and tells that even whilst still an Economics Under-Graduate she had been offered a job on the strength thereof. I had a school-friend who studied the subject Natalia rejected and he went on to become a Fine Arts expert at one of London’s major Auction Houses. It was what he loved, what he was good at, and it must have paid a healthy wage.

…but consider; a certain young lad at one of England’s Grammar schools (schools for poor but bright boys) who became interested in Physics. He read the subject at London University (i.e. not Oxford or Cambridge). On graduation he sought a post there as Lecturer, but was rejected. Some time later, he was told by the great Heisenberg (the man who could not decide whether or not his Cat was dead) that he did not understand the basis of Physics, but even so, fortunately managed to acquire a Research post at Edinburgh University. His seminal 1964 paper was initially rejected for publication. So much for for STEM being a key to wealth, and by the way, can you see a woman pursuing Physics despite such humiliations and setbacks? Of course not every-one finds a Boson which by pure coincidence just happens to bear ones name, even if it took nearly fifty years to find empirical evidence in support of the Theory.

Well done Peter Higgs (and the guys at CERN)!!!!

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Eric July 4, 2012 at 11:17

Keyster:
In the universities, fraternaties are this very system in embryo. The corporate bosses are just older frat punks.

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Eric July 4, 2012 at 11:40

Opus:
I agree that liberal arts are valuable, but I think you’re assuming that American schools/universities are on the same level as British ones.

In my pre-MRM days, I once dated a grad student in English Literature from the UW. When I first met her, I asked her about her favorite English poets. I never heard of a single one she’d studied (all of whom happened to be female). In 4-5 years of college, she’d never read Shelley, Byron, Chaucer, or Wordsworth. In fact, she didn’t even know who they were when I brought them up.

Recently, I talked to a guy who was taking US History at the UW. He showed me his course syllabus. The course was divided into four sections: the first described how the evil whiteys stole the continent from the Indians and Mexicans. The second was about how the blacks, from the Civil War onwards, struggled to overthrow white supremacy. The third was about the rise of labor and their attempts to overthrow the exploitative capitalist class. The final section of course, began with the Sufferagettes and the heroic efforts of women to throw of male oppression.

It hardly needs to added that the professor was a white guy too. The student who showed me this said he was thinking of dropping out and going to trade school. The last straw for him was overhearing a bunch of Arab students laughing over how weak American men were to let themselves subjected to this depreciation on a regular basis.

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Mark Plus July 4, 2012 at 11:46

Wait a minute. You mean women can’t take their liberal arts degrees and get glamorous, well-paid jobs at fashion magazines, like in all those TV series and movies?

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Opus July 4, 2012 at 13:00

@Eric

I am shocked. Even from my A levels I can still quote vast amounts of Keats, Byron and Chaucer – and Shakespeare. I did not read EngLit at University, but, I recall that it was always thought of as a serious subject: If you read it at Oxbridge you would (for example) read ALL 37 Shakespeare plays in your time there and no doubt much else. Germaine Greer – a Professor of English Literature – wrote a book entitled Slipshod Sybils which is what she thought of female poets. This is what she says: ‘You have to take yourself seriously to do poetry and either women couldn’t manage that at all or assumed a levity that became mere self importance’. She is scathing about Plath whom she describes as ‘a parody of half understood male literature… still pleasing Daddy’.

I am not sure whether you are implying that British Universities educate to a higher standard? Sometimes over here, one hears it suggested that a degree from an American University is like a British A level (taken at 18) but I always assumed that that was anti-american jealousy.

As for American History, (which begins I say in 1620) how about the bravery of the early colonists, the fight for Independance, the difficulties thereafter in getting a workable constitution, Democracy (nowhere else in the world had anything like it) your growing overseas trade, technical know-how, assimilation of vast numbers of aliens and various wars etc.
The course your friend was doing is a travesty.

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Eric July 4, 2012 at 14:51

Opus:
I think that British universities (and for that matter all of Europe and most of Asia) are far superior to ours. The only place where American universities are still really dominant is in Medicine, and some the higher sciences and engineering. That mostly is because of the funding and resources those departments have.

Literature was once a serious subject here too. In fact, in the past, American Literature was required along with English Lit; so besides all of Shakespeare, they had to read all of Emerson, Longfellow and others.

Did you get a chance to check out the link I posted above? That’s a fairly representative university-level course selection in the US.

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Opus July 4, 2012 at 15:17

@Eric

Yes I did check out the link – thanks. I particularily noted that the course in Biology had been cancelled! Of course with so many Universities there is plenty of room for variety, and I imagine a pecking order, ranging from Diploma Mills to Harvard and Princeton. The same happens over here, I regret to say, although it is inevitable. Not everyone can be brilliant and if everyone is to attend tertiary education, then allowances have to be made. Perhaps I should understand ‘Worthless’ in that light, as the Captain is no fool.

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Eric July 4, 2012 at 17:47

Art:
‘I think feminists have a disdain for the scientific method…&c.’

Rhetoric and logic have largely been replaced in the universities because they were supposedly too ‘male-centric’. They’ve been replaced by Marxist Dialectic, which was ironically also concocted by dead white males.

The real issue the feminists have with traditional logic is that it requires proof for a ‘thesis’ or argument to be considered valid. Dialectic really only amounts to achieving a compromise position on an ‘issue’. But you’re correct; the entire system is demolished when it comes up against reality like physical laws or mathematics.

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Eric July 4, 2012 at 17:55

Thomas-Tell-Truth:
‘That’s an inevitable side effect of maternalism.’

I remember reading a story once about Henry Ford. One of his enemies told the press that one of his top production managers had a criminal record. Ford did a photo-op with the guy afterwards posing with a car. Ford pointed to the car and told the press: ‘the only credentials or records I care about is how well and how many of these a man can make.’

Those feminised corporate frat punks could learn a lot from a real businessman.

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ode July 5, 2012 at 01:44

To Eric
A man like Henry Ford would feel more at home in a country like China today rather then the USA. I can’t imagine a businessman having the balls to say something like that in our world. Of course the most damaging accusation to a man’s character would not be a criminal record but instead being accused of not believing in the holy trinity of: feminism, environmentalism, and multiculturalism.

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Darryl X July 5, 2012 at 05:02

@ Eric -

Even concerning the natural sciences American universities are grossly inadequate. They still acquiesce to the politically correct narrative of feminism. If you are a young man who is bright and self-motivated and demonstrates initiative, there will be no formal advantage to higher education.

Ralph Catalano is a Professor of Public Health at UC Berekeley and he wrote in an article for the Wall Street Journal, “We’re at risk of having a generation of young males who aren’t well-connected to the labor market and who don’t feel strong ownership of community or society because they haven’t benefited from it.”

When I was in university, feminists ran the place. No matter how important and how much scientific support there was for an original idea, it was not promoted and was in fact condemned if it did not conform to the politically correct narrative of feminism.

The current ratio of men and women matriculated at university throughout the US is about 2:3. I understand that ratio is shrinking. Despite the decline in number of men at university, there is still a disproportionate number of them in curricula like the sciences, art and engineering.

But this will not help the US or developed world because even after they have earned their degrees, the opportunities for them are very limited and they are punished for their educations and scholar and innovation and initiative and contributions and fatherhood and manhood.

A middle-aged man with a PhD earning an average annual income for the US (most men with PhD’s are unable to find employment in the US in their fields) has a 50% chance of getting divorced and losing custody of his children. His order for child support will depend upon and be imputed as a function of his education and his work experience and how much he gets paid of course.

Meaning that a man with a PhD who owes child support and had spent eleven years at university without an income will by middle age not have a net-worth greater than that of a Walmart stock boy who never graduated from high-school.

At the same time, there is a 50% probability that he is in arrears and is at risk of prison and losing his driver license and business license and passport. Our feminst government has gone out of its way to discourage men from getting educations, pursuing employment and participating in society. A greater recipe for disaster could not be imagined.

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Steve_85 July 5, 2012 at 06:20

Two things.

Thing the First.
I just clicked a link here to Feministe… those chicks are absolutely batshit. Their ideal world is one where no one would be scared of having their position swapped with anyone else?

Thing the Second.
Comments about Medical degrees? I’m doing a bachelor of Biomedical Science currently. It gives a solid understanding on how the human body works, as well as laboratory skills. It allows graduates to work in most medical fields, and has an option of doing another two years to give you a Medicine degree.

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Firepower July 5, 2012 at 09:37

Art Vandelay

I think feminists have a disdain for the scientific method.

You need to expand upon this observation more – so more mras are made aware. It’s a leader’s duty to spread the word of his great discovery.

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Keyster July 5, 2012 at 10:25

@keyster Those guys don’t sound alpha at all, they sound like beta ass kissers who happen to be higher than the other beta ass kissers. I can’t see you staying in a job like that so what was your solution?

I ran my own business for a few years. Worked my ass off just to break even, but it was enjoyable. Before that I would do a couple of bong hits each morning and make a mad dash for the coffee machine once I arrived at my cubicle. Being stoned and buzzed on coffee allowed me to fit right in – – kind of stupid, but nice.

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Eric July 5, 2012 at 19:23

Ode:
Cornelius Vanderbilt even topped that one. He was building a railroad bridge somewhere once and some socialists were complaining because he paid some high-priced engineers and specialists to build a really solid one instead of hiring cheap local labor to put up a crappy one. The press was sneering that Vanderbilt was building a ‘monument to himself’. A reporter asked him, or rather told him, that his image was negative with the public.

‘Public opinion be damned.’ Vanderbilt replied. ‘I’m not trying to win a popularity contest. They should be glad I’m giving them a bridge that won’t collapse under their weight.’

Imagine a businessman with the balls to say something like that to the press! LOL

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Art Vandelay July 6, 2012 at 03:59

You need to expand upon this observation more – so more mras are made aware. It’s a leader’s duty to spread the word of his great discovery.

haha, you said doody.

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B July 6, 2012 at 09:04

Education in America is a complex issue. I was educated in Australia in my teens, went to university there, plus went to University in Texas after a stint in the US Military. My two cents worth is that the world is changing so fast that its becoming difficult to keep up with the latest trends in technology, and what is relevant today may become redundant in three years time. My basic thoughts are these:
- my education in computers in the 1990′s is outdated.Hardware and software just change too damn much nowdays!
- Financial literacy should be made compulsory for all high school and college students, including ‘real world’ financial challenges ( buying a house for example).
-it should be compulsory that students learn a foreign language- nowdays I recommend Chinese.
- the general studies subjects I was forced to take at University were not complete wastes of time, but more tolerable when education wasn’t so damned expensive! I would prefer to get an education in real world issues, like car mechanics, basic appliance or motorcycle repair.
-I achieved a bachelors degree, went to US military flight school, and have held leadership and management positions both in and out of the military. Why should I get an MBA? Real life has taught me far more than any more time in school will, and just to sacrifice two more years of school for another piece of paper just seems pointless.
I don’t have the answers. The system needs to be changed to reflect real world demands, but those demand are very complex and difficult to predict.

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mrcs84usn July 8, 2012 at 19:35

I have one of those useless 4-year degrees. Luckily, my debt is only about 25k, so it’s not TOO terribly bad. If I could have done it all over again, I would have gone straight into the military after high school. You don’t have to do all of these intuitive processes to beat the system or manuver through the pitfalls of trying to get educated.

I talk to some of my senior enlisted, and there are E-7+ that got their masters/doctorates for free.

In the Navy, ranking up from E-1 to E-3 is automatic, and then ranking up all the way to E-7 is based primarily on how well you do on a test. You have about 6 months to study for said test, and you are provided ALL of the study material needed as well as there being multiple study groups to help you can attend. Oh, lets not forget that 2 things that that everyone knows is that every test is multiple choice and there are an equal number of A, B, C, and D answers.

People like to say that the military don’t make much, but we don’t pay for much of anything. Free medical/dental/food/housing, etc. And lets not forget that “military discounts” are all over the place. Your average highschooler coming into the military will have a cell phone bill, and that’s it. So as an E-3, with a $100 a month in expenses is pocketing about $1300 a month after taxes. A NET income of almost 16k is pretty damn good for someone straight out of high school with no marketable skills.

Whether they choose to do 4 years and get out (GI Bill anyone?), or shoot for the whole 20, the military is significantly more cost effective than going to any school that you have to pay for, and having prior service is a good way to pad the resume. OJT/experience will almost always outweigh having a degree.

I am also an advocate for trade schools in you can handle doing blue collar work. About 6 months of school followed by actually getting into the workforces with minimal debt seems better than 4 years of school with debt upon interest upon more debt upon more interest, just to find a menial job that has little/nothing to do with your degree.

I’ve only been in the military for about 9 months, and since joining, I’ve almost quadrupled my worth, and I am on track to paying my debt within the next 5-7 years.

Sorry if this seems like an advertizement/recruitment post, but I’m just sayin.

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