Men who Dared

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by Featured Guest on February 7, 2012

By Carnivore

A friend sent me a link to the YouTube video below over 18 months ago. It’s a leisurely stroll down the El Camino del Rey, or the King’s Walkway, which is in Spain. I don’t have acrophobia – the sky deck of the Sears Tower doesn’t bother me. Take away the protection, such as guardrails and a sturdy floor, and it’s a different story. I can attest to the fact that watching this video in full screen mode is, ummm, interesting. Give it a try. The video starts out a little slow, but once the soundtrack picks up, it gets more exciting around 1:30.

The man doing the taping, Daniel Ahnen, is able to walk quickly because he is not using a safety harness as others do whom he bypasses. You can see some of Daniel’s art at his web site, youclimb.de. He’s an example of a ballsy guy taking risks. It’s men with a vision taking risks who bring about advancement, progress, art and the many things we take for granted in civilization.

Consider the risks taken by the men who originally built El Camino del Rey from 1901 to 1905. The path is only a meter wide and rises over 350 feet above the river below. It was built to allow workers to quickly travel between two dams. Without the walkway, they had to climb up and down the mountains which was both time consuming and dangerous. It is currently unused, in very poor repair with sections of the walkway missing and most of the guardrails gone. The early form of the walkway wasn’t much better:

I remembered the video when I recently came across a book in my collection, Ten Who Dared which hasn’t been cracked open in 20 years. Received as a gift on my birthday in 1977, it was the companion book to the television series, Ten Who Dared, aka The Explorers in the UK. (Not to be confused with the 1960 Disney movie, Ten Who Dared.) The series made an impression on me as a young man at the time. Each week, it related the story of an explorer, ten in all. They were:

  • Christopher Columbus – discoverer of America
  • Francisco Pizarro – conqueror of the Incas
  • James Cook – circumnavigated the globe and Britain’s greatest maritime explorer
  • Alexander von Humboldt – explorer of the Orinoco river in South America
  • Jedediah Smith – explorer of the American West
  • Robert Burke and William Wills – first to cross Australia from south to north
  • Henry Morton Stanley – led the first expedition of the Congo from east to west
  • Charles M Doughty – first western explorer of the Arabian Desert
  • Roald Amundsen – first to reach the south pole

Ten explorers, however, Burke and Wills are paired, so that only makes nine. Ah, yes. The series and book were produced in the mid-1970′s don’t forget. So there had to be, take a guess, a token female. In this case, none other than Mary Kingsley who explored Gabon. Whereas the male explorers listed above made treks measuring in hundreds and thousands of miles which lasted months and years, Kingsley’s expedition of 70 miles was a bit more modest:

Her trip – just seven days among the cannibals of Gabon – was one of the least extensive in the annals of discovery, but it revealed a brave woman, not only in the physical hardships she endured, but in her forthright, farsighted expression of ideas of brotherhood.

So writes Desmond Wilcox, author of the book and head of the BBC department which produced the series. This attempt at political correctness was only a feeble first step, in line with the late 1970′s. Note the naivet in the use of the word “brotherhood” which would be totally unacceptable today. For that matter, near the end of the book, one page contains a chronology of exploration listing 63 explorers including the featured eleven, with only two out of the 63 being female. The other female is Florence Baker who is listed along with her husband, Samuel Baker. I don’t know if Samuel is the only real explorer with his wife as a tag-along; I have no interest in researching her further. Perhaps even more unacceptable is the fact that the chronology is a list of white males. A much greater faux pas these days. Such a book would not be written today nor would such a TV series be produced.

One might argue that the contributions and the discoveries of the ten explorers overshadow the work of Daniel Ahnen. Perhaps that’s true. But, they have something very important in common – that male spark and drive to challenge the unknown. The narrator of the TV series, actor Anthony Quinn, put it best in the book’s preface:

When I signed on to narrate the television show on which this book is based, it wasn’t just another job. I feel a tremendous sense of kinship with people who dare to give shape to the unknown.

I get this feeling partly because I am an actor and I think of acting as exploration. To me, getting into a part is a voyage.

But I have a much larger reason for my feelings about the ten people in this book.

It’s sad that most of us live our lives trying to play it safe, taking few risks. As children we are used to constant challenges from other kids – the games of “I dare you” that force us to find courage to expand our world. But as we get older, fewer and fewer know how to turn the game into a way of life.

This knowledge is the key to daring on the highest human level – an artistic level. Certainly Paul Gauguin (an artist I played once in a picture) had it. He sacrificed a comfortable, safe life as a banker to go off and commit his life to painting. But so does any obscure writer facing a blank sheet of paper and preparing to expose his deepest feelings in words.

And so did these ten explorers – some famous, some obscure. They put their lives on the line to meet a challenge.

To some, the urge to face hardship and death was a raw compulsion to be first. But in any competition that has meaning, the most important thing is the competitor’s will to compete with himself – to get the best out of himself.

All of the ten, even the losers, had that will. In having it, and showing us that they had it, they help stretch everybody’s capacities for life.

While making movies, I’ve been to some of the places mentioned in this book. I’ve walked in the Arabian desert and felt the heat simmer up from the sand. Once, I was lost in the dunes for a while. I was overwhelmed by a sense of solitude and beauty. So I can see why a man might be enchanted and driven by the spirit of the land he was exploring.

But that’s not essential. What counts is the dream each of the ten had. We all have dreams, but for the most of us they remain just that.

These ten people had the rare ability to reach out of the dream and touch reality. That’s what we really mean when we say they dared.

Daniel Ahnen, the man who taped the King’s Walkway video, perished in May of 2011 while trekking in the Chamoli district of India, at 35 years of age. He accidentally slipped and fell into a gorge. He, too, was a man who dared.


{ 52 comments… read them below or add one }

Ryu February 7, 2012 at 11:20

The world owes a great deal to that non-diverse, non-PC group of explorers and adventurers.

Of course, it will be interesting to see what becomes of a world where such men are demonized and forced to hate themselves. That particular extended group explored the new world, Antarctica, the bottom of the oceans and the Moon. Their history is being washed away.

Other special interest groups have very different POVs on Columbus, Pizarro, Cook and Stanley than some of us do. The efforts at rewriting the past have already begun. Spielberg just put out a movie called Red Tails, more properly titled Red Tales, on such a subject. There you may view the new PC ideal.

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keyster February 7, 2012 at 11:50

It’s Politically Incorrect to display a list or talk about courageous explorers without mentioning the great Sacagawea. She was instrumental in guiding a Louis Clarkson (not sure if I have the name right) in discovery of the American north west during the early 19th century.

She has memorial statues and things named after her, to commorate her greatness, including:

A river
A lake
A battleship
A national park
3 different mountian peaks
And a her very own dollar coin

The National American Woman Suffrage Association of the early twentieth century adopted her as a symbol of women’s worth and independence, doing much to spread the myth of her accomplishments.

So from now on whenever you refer to explorers, you must state it as “the men and women explorers” of history; thanks to Sacagawea.

Thank you for your consideration.

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Acksiom February 7, 2012 at 11:51

Operative term here being. . .

. . “was”.

“Was,” as in NOT HERE ANYMORE.

“Was,” as in DEAD.

Thanks, but no thanks. From where I stand, this is just more promotion of specifically male self-destruction in order to help guarantee a continuing resupply of male self-sacrificers to grease the wheels of progress for everyone else.

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universe February 7, 2012 at 12:01

Great vid.

As Carnivore mentioned above, the walkway between the gorges was built by and with much physical risk to each participant as early as 1905 (!), yet. It’s fairly well understood that most if not all who participated in the construction were…who else?…men or boys.

The part I wish most to comment most upon is this.
We weren’t present to observe the many efforts that went into building such a rudementary but magnificent traverse between mountains. That all we see now is the outcome of all the daily combined efforts performed at some risk to each participant. Those alive during that day and utmost more so for those at the building of that abridgement laid a foundation for others to move with greater ease then and for us to marvel at now.
Ernest Schackleton, the explorer of the Ant-arctic found his crew by placing an ad in newspapers of the day – “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in event of success.” He apparently was was deluged and overwhelmed with responses.

(Cover your eyes, some of you) the same can be said for those of us alive who will today lay a foundation for those who will traverse the gorge between reason and insanity in the social war birthed by feminist hatred and base ignorance and lay a much better foundation. This can be done as the world exists now or after the oft predicted meltdown of the civilization.
What we may engage in at some risk to ourselves today will have a benefit for other men and their children in 100 years or less.

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Nico February 7, 2012 at 12:01

It reminds me of another daredevil who died prematurely too, Steve Irwin:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LZtmb_tRHdU

But there are plenty of examples.

I would argue – along with Roy Baumeister – that true intellectual and artistic work shares many characteristics with the kind of risk-taking these discoverers took.

In some societies it can be physically dangerous to express non-conventional ideas. Our democracies have learnt to value the contribution of dissenting voices.

But intellectual work also requires some qualities that would be necessary to a discoverer. You need to be thrilled by novelty. You need to be patient and dogged. You often have to shun away the prospect of easy immediate material gratification to pursue more distant and dubious rewards.

Many fail along the way. They took the wrong road.

Some others succeeded but didnt live to see their achievement acknowledged by their peers, like Gregor Mendel. Their work may ultimately benefit society.

Many great scientific were also discoverers. Think of Alfred Russel Wallace.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Russel_Wallace

Even Darwin was brave enough to travel around the world.

Intellectual discoverers are almost always men.

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Rebel February 7, 2012 at 12:40

@Keyster”

“So from now on whenever you refer to explorers, you must state it as the men and women explorers of history; thanks to Sacagawea.”

Pardon me but I care very much about accuracy…

The proper words to use would then be:the great multitude of men and one woman explorers….

Call me picky…

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archmage_lo February 7, 2012 at 13:05

I notice all the inventors are men.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyCDzLebBpc

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thesecond February 7, 2012 at 13:32

Sacagawea didn’t risk herself much on that trip. She mostly served to help natives know that the explorerers weren’t hostile- no one would bring a woman along on a war party, and she was a pretty good negotiator. She also helped them find and cook plant roots.

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loopy February 7, 2012 at 13:39

We’re all eternally gratefull to whitey for his accomplishments, achievements and such, but when is he going to devise a more honest social model of society ?

For he knows as well as I do that young can only grow an illusory middle class by plundering men and children up to a given point, after which to go further becomes counter productive.

When are white women going to be made to actually work for their worth, such that they might grow just as hairy, smelly and jaded from the exertions of endless labour as men ?

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Paradoxotaur February 7, 2012 at 13:51

Sacagawea was also about 13 years old at the time and pregnant when Lewis and Clark began their westward journey. She was one of the wives of their interpreter, Charbonneau, who purchased or won her (exact details are unclear) from the Hidatsa, who had earlier kidnapped her and other Shoshone girls, I believe from around what is now Three Forks, Montanna. She was included in the expedition primarily in anticipation of needing her translation skills (Shoshone), which Charbonneau did not have. She gave birth to a son along the way. I think the statues of her are hilarious. We don’t really know what she looked like, but we know she was about 13, and most of the statues show a very mature woman.

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Monad February 7, 2012 at 13:59

In the video below a guy climbs to the top of a a 1768 foot antenna tower as part of his everyday job…without a safely line. Just viewing the video is enough to make my stomach turn.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgO4Gd4RhvM

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Snark February 7, 2012 at 14:02

@ loopy

“When are white women going to be made to actually work for their worth”

When men stop idiotically assigning inherent value to them based on nothing but their possession of a vagina.

When men at large stop being so stupid regarding women, and recognise they have collective interests as men, and have done for a long time; when they realise the psyops and manipulative tricks women play; when they realise women fundamentally see them as disposable beasts of burden – then men might actually set some standards for female behaviour.

Like, she’s not worthy of respect, and she’s not worth shit, just for sitting there, looking pretty and demanding things.

The first question a man should ask a woman is: “what have you achieved with your life?” Specifically, what does she have to her name that hasn’t been paid for by daddy or hubby or some other sap.

Women aren’t going to have to work for their worth as long as idiot chivalrist men are willing to carry them, and to force us ALL to carry them through involuntary redistribution.

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Ryu February 7, 2012 at 14:28

I can beat that. Sasquatch had some help on the “Lewis and Clark” expedition. No, not from Lewis or Clark.

Apparently, there may have been a slave on the journey. His presence explains it’s success. Right on time for black history month:
http://stuffblackpeopledontlike.blogspot.com/2012/02/move-over-sacajawea-york-black-slave.html

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Anonymous Reader February 7, 2012 at 15:09

Last year a friend of mine was grumbling over a beer that his children have learned more about the “underground railroad” than the building of the transcontinental railroad; more about Sojourner Truth than Kit Carson; that the only thing they knew about Thomas Jefferson was that he was a slaveowner; and so forth. I asked him if he was teaching them anything at home? Like, maybe showing them the History Channel DVD’s on the Revolution? He grumbled some more about videogame/computer habits making it hard to teach anything- duh, well, who brought those things into the house?

Oh, their mother, who caters to the whims of the children. Ah.

I pointed him to Roissy. No word back yet.

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Gaz February 7, 2012 at 15:18

Two words: Douglas Mawson.

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Charles Martel February 7, 2012 at 15:35

Ryu
I can beat that. Sasquatch had some help on the Lewis and Clark expedition. No, not from Lewis or Clark……Apparently, there may have been a slave on the journey. His presence explains its success. Right on time for black history month:

I’ve recently been reading Lewis and Clark’s diaries. Sacagawea’s role in the success of the expedition has been exaggerated in contemporary accounts. Clark’s slave York, on the other hand, appears to have played a role similar to that of the other men. He was an effective hunter and also made a helpful impression on the Indians encountered by the expedition, many of whom had not seen a black man before. I have no problem with York receiving some attention. It’s a shame the other thirty-odd white men who formed the Corps of Discovery will remain unknown.

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Pops February 7, 2012 at 16:40

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Ryu February 7, 2012 at 16:52

Chuck,

That’s a dangerous thing to do.

You’ve conceeded to the opposition. York may have had a small role in helping the expedition. The left will take that small concession and blow it up so that America was build on slave labor and on the backs of the indians. In truth there may be a small middle ground. It is a mistake to dwell upon it, or even to bring it up.

I see other nations that made such a concession. In time it led to them giving their government to the natives out of guilt. The story of Haiti, the Belgian Congo, Rhodesia and South Africa is well known. Their examples demonstrate that their is no useful middle ground to be had. Rhodesia chased out all the whites and collapsed. South Africa is doing the same. Great Britain is just beginning to do this.

Moderation is a dangerous pastime. An extremist on either side will have more convication and will overpower the moderates. It is why the republicans are so weak compared to democrats. Too much intellect. Emotion for the many, logic for the few. If you’d like to fight the multiculturalists effectively, you must imitate their passion.

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Anonymous age 69 February 7, 2012 at 16:56

The Fems have attempted to discredit every major invention, all by men. So, I am going to be really brave here, and point out that it is not certain that Sacajawea was more than a translator. It is alleged that she guided them places she had never been. But, her husband who was with them had been.

IF it were not for the dedicated attack on all male achievements, I would be very chivalrous and not mention this. But, under the circumstances, why not? My (mentally ill) mother used to say, what is good for the goose is good for the gander.

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Anonymous age 69 February 7, 2012 at 17:01

Alexis D’tocqueville (sp?) was a French nobleman who in the early 1800′s visited the USA, to learn what it was like. Among other things he commented that people in dictatorial France had more personal freedom than the citizens of the US.

But, relevant here, was seeing two sides of a river, (probably the Ohio, but that is by an obviously defective memorry) one side was free, the other side was slave. The slave side was pretty cruddy, and poorly planted. The free side was booming and prosperous. So claims of great achievements by slaves at any significant level are dubious.

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W.F. Price February 7, 2012 at 17:09

Ive recently been reading Lewis and Clarks diaries. Sacagaweas role in the success of the expedition has been exaggerated in contemporary accounts. Clarks slave York, on the other hand, appears to have played a role similar to that of the other men. He was an effective hunter and also made a helpful impression on the Indians encountered by the expedition, many of whom had not seen a black man before. I have no problem with York receiving some attention. Its a shame the other thirty-odd white men who formed the Corps of Discovery will remain unknown.

-Charles Martel

York was a solid member of the team, but once they got to the upper Missouri everyone had to be. In the accounts I’ve read, York was pretty much one of the guys, and on the level with the others. What is sad about his story is that he and Clark had a falling out upon their return, with York apparently feeling that he’d earned his freedom, and Clark harshly refusing it.

This shows how slavery corrupts the master at the same time as it degrades the slave. Clark’s cruel treatment of York following the expedition is perhaps the only glaring flaw in his otherwise admirable life. Nevertheless, the statue in Portland depicting York’s scars from whippings on Clark’s orders is in extremely poor taste (and it is a crude, artless work). Whippings were common punishment those days for slave and freeman alike, and in fact some of the other white members of the expedition were whipped as well (in one case for taking extra whiskey, if I remember correctly).

Sacagawea, for her part, was helpful primarily for her connections with the Shoshone. She also seems to have never complained, and to have made herself useful. The only time I can think of that she demanded any special treatment was when she pleaded to see a beached whale in Oregon (she’d never seen the ocean, and I guess she just had to see this creature).

As for some of the other white men, their stories are out there, and will be told again. Some of them were very impressive characters, such as John Colter, and there’s plenty more that could be (and probably will be) written about them.

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freebird February 7, 2012 at 17:19

The feminists won’t even acknowledge the current contributions by the men in
the armed forces and police forces,much less in history.

There’s a good video documentary on the building of the Macinaw Bridge,lots of men perished in the caissons.
No mention of any female deaths,as with most construction projects, like Hoover Dam.

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Charles Martel February 7, 2012 at 17:51

As for some of the other white men, their stories are out there, and will be told again.

Yes, I didn’t mean these men are literally unknown – they are named in the diaries – but that they are not known to the average American, they are invisible to mainstream culture. Sacagawea, on the other hand, is celebrated for being an accidental participant. She’s often referred to in the diaries as “Sharbonos squar” and was on the expedition as a kind of two-fer. Lewis and Clark hired Charbonneau the French trapper as an interpreter and he happened to have a teenage Indian slave/wife.

The men of the Corps of Discovery were literal pack mules for much of the expedition. The expedition’s boats were propelled up the Missouri river by poling or by the use of a towline. The men often had to cut the timber along the river bank as they went in order to be able to tow the boats. The boats were also portaged (carried) many times. My guess is that Sacagawea, a teenage girl, was literally a passenger much of the time.

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Rebel February 7, 2012 at 17:52

Anonymous age 69 February 7, 2012 at 16:56
The Fems have attempted to discredit every major invention, all by men.

If fems had their way, they would chose to live in grass huts just because they are green with jealousy that all inventions were made by men. It invalidates their claims of being “superior” (my ass) to mere men. This is a sure sign of inferiority, if you ask me…

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Carnivore February 7, 2012 at 18:02

I wrote this after browsing that book after all these years because it brought to my mind the one statement that absolutely grates on me, that’s the most lousy, stupid, hateful, ungrateful, vicious, spiteful, bitchy, ignorant self-centered statement a woman can make: “Women need men like a fish needs a bicycle.”

And this article is only the tip of the iceberg. Discovery is one part. There’s also building and then maintaining (as the video of the tower climber shows).

The point Ryu brings up is valid, although I’d say it’s more a matter of dilution than moderation. It’s upon the shoulders of the leader where success or failure rests. Bringing up 6th magnitude stars only takes away from the 1st magnitude star. Eventually, the achievement is diluted. Or course, we never hear of the female or minority who shared in the same bad decisions of the white male who led a failed expedition.

There are also only so many hours in the day. Scholarly works which shine a light under every rock are one thing. Selectively editing school text books results in students and later adults who do not know their own history.

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Anon February 7, 2012 at 18:13

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Anon February 7, 2012 at 18:14

I somehow get the impression that if a white woman took credit for anything a black man or Jewish man did, Ryu would side with the white woman.

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Charles Martel February 7, 2012 at 18:21

Ryu
Thats a dangerous thing to do.
Youve conceeded to the opposition. York may have had a small role in helping the expedition. The left will take that small concession and blow it up so that America was build on slave labor and on the backs of the indians. In truth there may be a small middle ground. It is a mistake to dwell upon it, or even to bring it up.

I haven’t conceded anything to anybody. I’ve read parts of the journals and it’s clear that York made a noteworthy contribution to the success of the expedition.

“…many Came to view us all day, much asstonished at my black Servent, who did not lose the oppertunity of his powers Strength &c. &. this nation never Saw a black man before…”…..William Clark, October 9th, 1804

“…the Inds. much astonished at my black Servent, who made him Self more turrible in thier view than I wished him to Doe as I am told telling them that before I cought him he was wild & lived upon people, young children was verry good eating Showed them his Strength &c. &c….”…..William Clark, October 10th, 1804

Lewis and Clark were masterful in creating an impression among the Indians they encountered that they were not to be fucked with. There were several elements to the creation of this perception. York was one element. The most important element was the military assault rifle carried by Lewis, which he demonstrated to the Indians at every opportunity.

From my own explorations of the journals, the expedition owed very little of its success to Sacagawea. She did virtually none of the guiding, translating and mediating ascribed to her.

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Pops February 7, 2012 at 18:34

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Rocco February 7, 2012 at 18:46

If feminists and females cannot accept risk and so do not achieve great things I think this very feminine quality belongs to women and they should own it just as the lab tech’s that worked in the the labs where great scientific discoveries or inventions were made.

This to, to me, is standard marxist feminism. There are no great people, men or women, because women can’t compete so all men and women are called winners, and, in this case get a statue.

I wonder why they can’t enjoy that Lewis and Clarke two humans, had the vision, organizational ability and tenacity to create this discovery then safely return and re-write all the geography books the world over.

In the feminist dystopia no great people are needed only prols and prols plus, females.

That’s why they don’t teach boys any more.

But, boys will be boys and the girls will fall behind.

As long as the boys don’t become slaves and GTOW.

@ Price

I agree, I about an experiment where subjects were told to shock a participant and eventually shock them to death. It was a set up, a psych experiment but most shocked the other to death, only some stood their ground and said no.

This is the position women are in and they are showing themselves to have extremely poor character, lying and cheating with no moral compass.

This feminst experiment could lead to a great clamp down on female freedom, it’s in the hands of women what will be their fate.

@ Anon 69

It is not a surprise that a dictatorship has more social freedom than the feminist US. And that you, living in freedom in Mexico would bring it up.

I hope to join you soon and escape the prison and social police of the U.S.

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Aharon February 7, 2012 at 18:59

Good solid piece of writing about men’s accomplishments which is something the re-writers of History seek to change. Thanks. The only bit I can add to lots of great comments is that the film Jeremiah Johnson with Redford was based loosely on the historical figure of Jedediah Smith.

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Rocco February 7, 2012 at 20:08

@ Charles

Could you imagine bringing a 13 year old pregnant 2012 American girl on such a journey?

How could they find the mall? Would the boat have a seperate bathroom? What kind of cell phone signal would they get?

Just watch a few minutes of “single teen mom” if you can stomach it to see that it would be worse than freezing to death in an antarctic exploration.

It is hard to imagine she wasn’t more of a burden than a help but, it’s wonderful she stayed with her husband while he traveled for work….women in the US that do that like military wives complain about it alot, I hear.

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Charles Martel February 7, 2012 at 21:22

Could you imagine bringing a 13 year old pregnant 2012 American girl on such a journey?

Sacagawea was not 13, she was 16 when she joined the expedition with Charbonneau in 1804.

It’s interesting to note that William Clark seemed to become quite fond of Sacagawea, nursing her devotedly when she was very ill in June 1805 and intervening on one occasion when Charbonneau struck her in August 1805. Clark later adopted her two children after Sacagawea died and Charbonneau abandoned them.

Lewis makes an interesting observation: Our present camp is precisely on the spot that the Snake Indians were encamped at the time the Minnetares of the Knife R. first came in sight of them five years since. from hence they retreated about three miles up Jeffersons river and concealed themselves in the woods, the Minnetares pursued, attacked them, killed 4 men 4 women a number of boys, and mad prisoners of all the females and four boys, Sah-cah-gar-we-ah or Indian woman was one of the female prisoners taken at that time; tho’ I cannot discover that she shews any immotion of sorrow in recollecting this events, or of joy in being again restored to her native country; if she has enough to eat and a few trinkets to wear I believe she would be perfectly content anywhere.…….Meriwether Lewis, July 28th, 1805

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stonelifter February 7, 2012 at 21:51

Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in event of success.
—–
I’m in! Working in the arctic would be a perfect last adventure before settling in to old age

One of the things I dislike the most about modern males is their risk aversion and damn near worship of comfort and soft living.

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Rocco February 7, 2012 at 23:16

OT

On the subject of females are incapable of horrible violence. And also a real life example of the CSI women we see on TV shoveling propaganda down our throats.

She was already a police woman, she killed her boyfriends fiance by tying her up, biting, beating stabbing and shooting her. It was undiscovered then, who would suspect a jealous girlfriend, that never happens.

So she eventually rose to head of art robbery division of the LAPD.

Of course the headline on CNN is “Broken heart” and not cold hearted killer climes ranks of LAPD.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/02/07/justice/lazarus-trial-cold-case/index.html?iref=obinsite

Now she’s convicted of murderer.

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JeremiahMRA February 8, 2012 at 00:16

Free solo climber Alex Honnold is pretty impressive as well: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SR1jwwagtaQ

(The bad part about this video is that the slut Lara Logan is in it.)

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JeremiahMRA February 8, 2012 at 00:17

By the way I really enjoy articles like this, tempts me to donate again.

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Rocco February 8, 2012 at 00:36

OT

Here’s a great example of what is going on behind the bench in family court.

This family court judge married his employee, judged her custody case, and fired the court clerk that reported him and she was payed 68K for the work abuse.

Now the woman is beating him and his kid sees it and calls the cops.

She, the judges wife is now serving 1 day for super minor DV.

You couldn’t make this stuff up, and they’re judging us.

http://record-eagle.com/local/x154958417/Judges-wife-jailed-in-investigation

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Opus February 8, 2012 at 03:18

I am always freaked by Shackleton. Brilliant, Mad or Lucky – god knows.

What about Mason and Dixon?

As for Jackie Chan, who slides down the skyscraper, in Who Am I? – I get vertigo just from watching.

I’d never heard of Sacagawea. What strikes me as different about her, is that she was on home territory and doing a job of sorts. All the adventurers like Daniel Ahnen were away from home and under absolutely no compulsion to do what they did, and for no obvious financial reward. Dare-devil stuff seems to be the province of White Males.

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Lara (another one) February 8, 2012 at 05:03

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W.F. Price February 8, 2012 at 07:51

I have always asked myself,,,therere so many things to improve in our planet, so many helping hand to give in a quite, not notorious but anonymous way,,,,,, so much peace to set around (without too much noise, without arms, wothout violence) that I dont undersatnd mens point of view,,,,

Oh, wait, yes, I understand,,,,they are risking their lifes and competing just for glory,,,,
In my country (Spain) more than 60 % of volunteers for NGOs are women.

-Lara

“just for glory…”

What’s wrong with that? Wouldn’t the world be a dull, uninspiring place if we were all weak, mild-mannered people working for NGOs?

Somehow, I don’t think women much care for those kinds of men anyway. Probably not even you.

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benignbullet February 8, 2012 at 08:25

“I have always asked myself…there’re so many things to improve in our planet…”

Sure you have.

But it’s these daring men – seeking glory or otherwise – who took life-and-limb risks, which led to the discovery of lands and resources ENABLING the development and improvement of that which you currently personally enjoy, and some aspects of the planet, overall.

In fact, I find it quite interesting that while females seem quite capable of understanding the microcosmic (the personal), they also seem quite incapable or unwilling to understand the macrocosmic (the broader implications of profound and/or ubiquitous interpersonal/international struggle).

In other words and more specifically, while females seem to find it perfectly reasonable to wrest with others (interpersonally) to the point of simply taking that which they feel entitled to – and often ruining lives and reputations along the way – at the same time, they find it perplexing that (mostly) men could engage in such behavior, but on a large scale (internationally, such as war), which is sometimes necessary for the protection, preservation, or even acquisition of that which it takes to keep the little ladies safe and…shopping!

Maybe this helps explain why whimmin (in their more noble moments) will involve themselves with causes that have a feel-good vibe about them; simply making them feel better about themselves, or advancing an already overly-saturated female-centric environment (in the West); while men have been and are still engaged in the search, development, and distribution of the materials, goods, and services which make such choices for whimmin even POSSIBLE (I’m repetitious, as there are females reading, just waiting to run around in little circles…but I try).

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Rocco February 8, 2012 at 08:34

@ Price

On 30 Rock Liz Lemon, the prototypical 40 year old unmarried, but marriage obsessed, wierd sex in the city feminist caricature has on her list of must haves in the only man she will lower herself to marry is astronaut.

They made this such an important plot line that they had her mothers ex-boyfriend be Buzz Aldren who was camio’d on the show and portrayed as a drunk crazy man who litterally talked and yelled at the moon.

Last night I watched a wonderful movie called “The Magic Bullet”, starring Edward G. Robinson in the movie he said he was most proud of, about a man who, in my opinion achieved glory. A scientist in Frankfurt around the turn of the century named Paul Ehrilich who discovered the staining process for tuberculosis so it could be diagnosed in any hospital, not a few labs in the world, a stain we still use just the same way today every day, in every hospital and then how develop serum with concentrated antibodies, a form of treatment that saved millions before more modern chemical treatments were discovered, and the idea of chemical treatments, specifically the first cure for syphillis.

He won a noble prize and died of the tuberculosis he was infected with during his research.

But when the last group of fascist ideologues came in they persecuted his jewish wife and daughters, just as feminists today would likely persecute him as they do any social researchers who do not continue to tell the feminist lies.

This is bravery.

When I worked in the lab studying HPV and cervical cancer, we all got warts and that was a level 3 federally approved viral lab with 3 seperate negative pressure rooms before you got to the virus.

We knew the risks, but now we have a vaccine and cervical cancer may be cured in our lifetime.

But I’m sure that using the method of false equivolency we can see that a person who every month collects money from their co-workers for some walk for the march of dimes has done just the same to benefit mankind.

And how, not teaching our children these values will result in less boys , the ones most likely talented and single minded to achieve something, thinking that the sacrifices to achieve great things, things that benefit the entirety of mankind is unimportant…..let’s see if I can beat level 27 in modern warfare.

This is what feminists want….zombified drugged up boys and a paycheck.

And that’s why the US will become a second rate nation.

Bio on Ehlich:
http://www.enotes.com/paul-ehrlich-reference/paul-ehrlich

The Magic Bullet:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032413/

If you do watch the movie, it was made in 1940 and stars Ruth Gordon as his wife and the portrayal of a devoted wife was astonishing given the reality of todays world.

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Rocco February 8, 2012 at 08:37

Sorry, must edit: He got tuberculosis and had to take months off, but died of a stroke.

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stonelifter February 8, 2012 at 11:18

I’ve seen the NGO hippie kids at work here in the A-stan. They don’t make anything better because they are completely divorced from reality.

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Lara (another one) February 9, 2012 at 02:20

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stonelifter February 9, 2012 at 08:31

come on out to the a-stan and watch them do their thing. they are dumb enough to think they can wander where ever they want here, problem free, or that the hajjis wouldn’t rape the chicks for dressing like sluts, even though it’s a common occurrence in the moslem world. heck most the degrees you listed are really worthless and provide not value to the world. the ones out here aren’t even that “well educated” and they are all extremely liberal.

put your money where your mouth is and meet me in kandahar. I’m the big guy with the scars and tattoos. You won’t mistake me for anyone else

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Auntie Pheminizm February 10, 2012 at 00:23

> “In my country (Spain) more than 60 % of volunteers for NGOs are women.”

Of course. Men, work actual jobs and so can’t afford to “volunteer.”

Much NGO “work” is done by females in offices built by men.

The also women poop and pee in toilets built by men, connected to sewage lines constructed by men.

The womyn communicate via phones and computers created by males.

The wimmin also ride to and from “work” using transportation devices built by men, feeding themselves on foods engineered-planted-harvested-processed by men.

The biggest contribution women make to ALL national GNPs is in the area of griping, They nearly wholly-own that activity.

Of course if their country is attacked you can count on them being ready to give “lewinskis” to whichever army wins. They won’t, of course, fight and die. That’s beneath their unicorn-riding selves.

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Anonymous February 15, 2012 at 10:11

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Karen February 16, 2012 at 20:43

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Ted February 18, 2012 at 15:20

“… few of you would have the balls … you all just whine … find your manhood and stop whining like a bunch of toddlers … Do something …”

Oh, go away.

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Sustainable Earth April 8, 2012 at 11:50

The question is, how many minorities were there by the sides of some of the greats during their quests? They just were not pictured because of the times.

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