The Misandry Bubble is Similar to other Economic Bubbles

by Pro-male/Anti-feminist Tech on January 24, 2010

(Disclaimer for this post: I am not nor do I claim to be an economist or have any formal education in economics.)

By now you have read The Fifth Horseman’s post on The Misandry Bubble. (If not, go read it right now.) The term, misandry bubble, is very accurate because the misandry bubble operates like an economic bubble.

Economic bubbles fall into two types. The first type is typically a technological related economic bubble. The Railway Mania in the 1800s and the dot com bubble are two examples of this type. Both of those bubbles had all of the typical behaviors of economic bubbles, over-investment, rampant speculation, etc. However, when all was said and done there were real economic gains. The Railway Mania produced railroads, and the dot com bubble expanded the internet and created related businesses such as amazon.com. The second type of economic bubble is what might be called an asset bubble. The Tulip Mania of the 1600s and the recent (or current depending on where you live) housing bubble are both examples of asset bubbles. In an asset bubble the price of an asset increases beyond its fundamental value so the price of that asset must come down through inflation, a price collapse, or a combination thereof.

The misandry bubble is clearly an asset bubble. The fundamental value of women has not increased. Women aren’t becoming more beautiful, or smarter, or better cooks, or better girlfriends, etc. By any metric you wish to use, women are not improving. If anything they are getting worse so their fundamental value is going down not up. Thus, the misandry bubble exists because the demands, the “price”, women are demanding from men is going up while the fundamental value of women is holding steady or really going down.

In an economic bubble there are several social psychology factors. One is extrapolation, the idea that because prices have risen in the past they will do so in the future. During the housing bubble we saw this with speculators who flipped houses, and other people who bought houses because if they didn’t buy soon, “they would be priced out forever”. Realtors would say, “real estate only goes up”. David Lereah, the former Chief Economist for the National Association of Realtors, wrote books about how home prices would continue to rise until around 2010 or so. The same claims were made about the oil price spike of 2008 such as demand from the BRIC countries would remain high. We see the same claims in the misandry bubble. A lot of men accept the increasing demands of women because either they are “white knights” or believe that they have no other choice. However, as we see from the collapse of the housing bubble and the 2008 oil price spike, extrapolation is wrong, and this is true with the misandry bubble as well.

Another factor is herding, the idea that investors buy or sell in the direction of the market trend. In the housing bubble, many investment fund managers bought the investment vehicles that were designed to sell mortgages. During the bubble, there were hardly any voices speaking out about how the problems with these mortgage investment vehicles. There were people who noticed, but kept their mouths shut since it could mean losing pay or their jobs. Herding also existed on the level of individual buyers who bought because “everyone else was doing it”.

One aspect of herding that isn’t well know is the use of shaming language to get people who would be skeptical of the behavior causing the bubble to fall in line. There was plenty of shaming language used in the housing bubble. Many made claims that renters were losers and “would be priced out forever” (as in they would forever have the stigma of being a renter since they wouldn’t be able to afford buying a house in the future). The biggest example of shaming language has to be the Century 21 commercial from 2006 (the below video).

In addition to the shaming language to get the husband to buy the house, there is also a great deal of misandry in this video. This is a case of the housing bubble and the misandry bubble overlapping.  The husband was right to be skeptical.  This commercial aired in 2006.  If the couple was really worried about schools, they could have waited two years (when their oldest was starting kindergarten) and saved a boatload of money.  Even better they could have rented waiting out the housing bubble in the location with the schools they wanted.  However, it was more important to make the husband fall in line despite the fact that he was originally right.  With the misandry bubble, shaming language is nothing new as we have the Catalog of Anti-Male Shaming Tactics.

We also see moral hazards with bubbles where the decision making of investors in terms of risk and reward is interfered with.  With the housing bubble, they are plenty of moral hazards as the government was and is encouraging people to buy houses.  The $8000 tax credit for new homeowners is a prime example.  It encourages people who would otherwise rationally weigh whether they would want to buy a house or not to believe there is less risk in buying a house than there actually is.  Moral hazards aren’t limited to government policy either.  The explosion of exotic mortgages during the housing bubble allowed people to buy houses they otherwise could not afford.  These moral hazards lead to many of the foreclosures we see today since they threw the risk-reward relationship of whether to buy a house or not out of whack.  Moral hazards also exist in the misandry bubble.  The clearest example is with divorce and family courts.  With the way divorce works now, women can easily divorce their husbands and get rewarded for it both financially and in getting the kids creating an incentive to get divorced.  The same is true with the false rape industry.  A woman can get away with making false rape accusations which creates an incentive to make false rape accusations.  In the churches, priests/ministers/pastors “encourage” men to get married (using plenty of shaming language) creating a moral hazard of men marrying women they otherwise wouldn’t.

When economic bubbles happen, people who implicitly or explicitly realize there is a bubble, make changes in their behavior.  Many people decided to wait out the housing bubble by renting to the point of deciding to rent their entire lives in some cases since they were soured on buying houses.  With the 2008 oil price spike, people changed their driving habits and started buying more fuel efficient cars.  The misandry bubble is no different.  Many men learn game, go ghost, become part of the marriage strike, or even just minimize their time alone with certain types of women.

Overproduction and the search for alternatives is another aspect of a bubble.  With the housing bubble, many more houses were built than needed.  Areas were gentrified by people looking for cheap housing.  The 2008 oil price spike led to increased oil production where possible and investment into alternative energy and other alternatives to oil.  With the misandry bubble many men decide to expat to find women or bring foreign women to where they live.  In the longer term, alternatives will include virtual reality sex, sex bots, and artificial wombs.  The creation of these technologies is guaranteed by the fact that the misandry bubble is an economic bubble.

However, the misandry bubble is different from economic bubbles in one important way.  The prices due to a bubble must come down through either inflation, lowered prices, or a combination.  There is no equivalent to inflation in the misandry bubble so the “price” women are demanding from men must by definition collapse to where it was before.  With the creation of technological alternatives, it will collapse to a lower level than it was before.

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